Lab Notes – Spring 2017

For MRSA, Resistance is Futile

UConn medicinal chemists have designed experimental antibiotics that kill Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a common and often deadly bacteria that causes skin, lung, and heart infections. The new antibiotics disable the bacteria’s vitamin B9 enzyme. Without vitamin B9, the bacteria can’t make essential amino acids and they die. Not only do the new antibiotics kill regular MRSA, they also kill types of the bacteria with unusual antibiotic-resistance genes that had never been seen before in the U.S. And that’s no accident: the chemists designed the antibiotics to latch on to the enzyme so cleverly that if it changed enough to elude them, it would no longer be able to do its job with vitamin B9. This could make the new antibiotics resistant to, well, resistance. The research was published in the Dec. 22, 2016 issue of Cell Chemical Biology.

MRSA colonies are shown on a blood agar plate.


State’s Leading Institutions Launch International Effort to Advance Metabolic Research

overweight 3D model running with target on metabolic area

UConn, Yale University, and The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) have partnered with the Weizmann Institute of Science, a prestigious counterpart in Israel, to fill a research void in metabolic diseases that affect billions of people worldwide. The goal of the newly formed Metabolic Research Alliance is to unite the expertise of the institutions on research projects that swiftly move investigations into clinical application and commercialization. The Alliance will employ a novel approach to coordinating existing and new expertise in the areas of immunology, cell biology, microbiota, and the rapidly evolving field of genomics. While investigations will initially focus on obesity and diabetes, the research projects will eventually pursue solutions to additional metabolic diseases.


Innovative Imaging Could Save Sight

Connecticut Innovations has awarded $500,000 to a team of UConn researchers to speed the process to commercialization of the biomarker probe they’re developing to detect a precursor to blindness. The team — led by Royce Mohan, associate professor of neuroscience at UConn Health, and including assistant professor of neuroscience Paola Bargagna-Mohan and UConn School of Pharmacy medicinal chemistry professor Dennis Wright — is developing a fluorescent small molecule imaging reagent to help identify preclinical stages of ocular fibrosis, which is associated with an aggressive form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) that causes rapid vision loss. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the U.S. The method would both enable earlier intervention and allow physicians to monitor the progress and effectiveness of interventions before it’s too late.


DOACs Safer Than Warfarin, Study Shows

Patients who suffered blunt traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) associated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) had significantly lower mortality rates and lower rates of operative intervention compared with a similar group taking warfarin, a study published in the November issue of Trauma and Acute Surgery by researchers from UConn, Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center, and Trinity College shows. Although DOACs have been an increasingly popular alternative to warfarin for anticoagulation, physicians have worried their use might lead to an increase in patient mortality from uncontrollable bleeding, according to the study. The study, based on data on 162 patients in the St. Francis Trauma Quality Improvement Program database, aimed to help close a gap in research on DOAC safety.

bloodclot in vein


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