Anastasios Tzingounis

New Epilepsy Drug May Be Safer, More Effective

A PET scan of human brain

A PET (positron emission tomography) scan shows blood flow and metabolic activity, used to diagnose the cause of epilepsy and for surgical planning.


A new drug that selectively affects potassium channels in the brain may offer effective treatment for epilepsy and prevent tinnitus, UConn neurophysiologist Anastasios Tzingounis and colleagues reported in a recent issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

The existing drugs to treat epilepsy don’t always work, and can have serious side effects. One of the more effective, called retigabine, helps open KCNQ potassium channels, which shut down the signaling of overly excited nerves. Unfortunately, retigabine has significant adverse side effects, including sleepiness, dizziness, problems with urination and hearing, and an unnerving tendency to turn people’s skin and eyes blue. Because of this, it’s usually only given to adults who don’t get relief from other epilepsy drugs.

This drug gives me a better tool to dissect the function of these channels. We need to find solutions for kids – and adults – with [epilepsy].

There are five different kinds of KCNQ potassium channels in the body, but only two are important in epilepsy and tinnitus: KCNQ2 and KCNQ3. The problem with retigabine is that it acts on other KCNQ potassium channels as well, and that’s why it has so many unwanted side effects.

Tzingounis’ research has found that a new drug – SF0034, which is chemically identical to retigabine, except with an extra fluorine atom – seems to open only KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 potassium channels, not affecting KCNQ4 or 5. It was more effective than retigabine at preventing seizures in animals, and it was also less toxic.

The drug company that developed SF0034, SciFluor, now plans to start FDA trials to see whether the drug is safe and effective in people. Treating epilepsy is the primary goal, but tinnitus can be similarly debilitating, and sufferers would welcome a decent treatment.

“This drug gives me another tool, and a better tool, to dissect the function of these channels,” Tzingounis says. “We need to find solutions for kids – and adults – with this problem.”