asthma

Working Together for Better Public Health

Q&A with Dr. Raul Pino, commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Public Health and a UConn Health board member

Q

What are some of the major public health issues facing Connecticut?

There are many public health issues facing both Connecticut and the nation as a whole. At the Department of Public Health, our emphasis is on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 6|18 initiative, which targets six major health conditions — asthma, high blood pressure, tobacco use, hospital-acquired infections, teen pregnancy, and diabetes — with 18 evidence-based public health interventions.

Each of these conditions is common, preventable, and costly, but importantly, all have proven interventions that can be effectively employed across the health care spectrum to improve both individual and community health, saving lives and dollars. Other areas where I believe we can see good results in Connecticut by employing evidence-based interventions include addressing HIV and the rising number of syphilis cases.


Q

How can physicians assist the DPH daily to address and reduce these issues?

Doctors, particularly primary care physicians, are the main point of contact with the public for health education. We need to engage practitioners in addressing the six major health conditions with their patients — screening for the conditions; educating in advance to enhance prevention of disease; and providing effective, evidence-based treatments when needed. Physicians play a critical role on the front lines of health care to shift our focus from treatment to prevention through lifestyle changes and other healthy choices. They are an indispensable part of the continuum of care between DPH, health care practitioners, and public health.


Q

As DPH commissioner, what drives your daily public health passion and mission?

I am convinced that we — as a nation, a state, and as public health professionals — can do more than we are currently doing to impact public and population health. Addressing the health disparities that continue to plague our population, costing millions of lives and countless health care dollars, is what drives me. We are so fortunate to live in one of the richest countries, and states, in the world, yet we spend so little on public health. My mission is to spread the message that modest investments of money, time, and effort in proven education and prevention methods can lessen these disparities, which will save millions of dollars in health care costs and, more importantly, save lives.


Q

Tell us about your connection to UConn Health and what you hope to accomplish as a member of the board of directors.

I am a 2009 graduate of the UConn Master of Public Health program and receive my own health care at UConn Health. Spending time there for my education and health care has really crystallized for me that UConn Health is the epicenter of clinical care and education in Connecticut. UConn Health is where advances in science and medicine happen, which allows patients to get the best in cutting-edge care. As a member of the board of directors, I am looking to learn and understand better the role that this large institution plays in public health work. I hope my passion for public health and the elimination of health disparities will allow me to give a voice to the importance of integrating education, prevention, public health, and clinical care in order to strengthen our health care system, curb rising health care costs, and foster healthy communities and individuals.

Lab Notes – Fall 2016

‘Morrbid’ RNA Could Be Key to Asthma Treatment

No.2 Pencil eraser erasing a piece of an RNA strand

Researchers have discovered a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory disorders that are characterized by abnormal myeloid cell lifespan, such as asthma, Churg-Strauss syndrome, and hypereosinophilic syndrome. Investigators including Adam Williams of UConn Health and The Jackson Laboratory named the novel long non-coding RNA ‘Morrbid’ (Myeloid RNA Regulator of Bim-Induced Death). They discovered that Morrbid tightly controls how long circulating myeloid cells live — which is key to maintaining the balance between fighting infection and exacerbating inflammation — by overriding a signaling mechanism that prevents premature immune cell death. In mice, deleting the gene helped protect them against inflammation and immunopathology. The findings were published online in Nature, Aug. 15, 2016.


Parents Living Longer is Good News for Offspring, Study Says

Father and young son laugh together and hug

A new study led by the University of Exeter and co-authored by the UConn Center on Aging, among other international contributors, shows that how long a person’s parents live can help predict how long the offspring will live, and how healthy the child will be as he or she ages. The study of 186,000 participants, aged 55 to 73 years and followed for up to eight years, is the largest of its kind. It found that a person’s chance of survival increased by 17 percent for each decade that at least one parent lived beyond age 70, and that those with longer-lived parents had lower rates of heart disease and other circulatory conditions, as well as cancer. The study was published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Aug. 15, 2016.


PRP Limits Ill Effects of Osteoarthritis Treatment

red blood cells

Giving platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to patients undergoing treatment for osteoarthritis may limit the negative effects of the drugs used to manage their symptoms, according to a new study led by Dr. Augustus Mazzocca, director of the UConn Musculoskeletal Institute, and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Osteoarthritis is the most common chronic condition of the joints, causing pain, stiffness, and swelling in approximately 27 million Americans. Powerful anti-inflammatory medicines and local anesthetics relieve pain and improve range of motion, but can also lead to tissue degeneration. In the study, published in the August issue of The American Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers found combining PRP with these treatments significantly reduced their toxic effect on the cells and even improved their proliferation.


Bath Salts 101: Pharmacist Explains Party Drugs

Synthetic party drugs with dangerous hallucinogenic properties, such as those sold commercially as “bath salts,” continue to pose a significant public health risk around the country. C. Michael White — head of the Department of Pharmacy Practice in UConn’s School of Pharmacy — published a comprehensive review of synthetic cathinones in the June 2016 issue of The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology to help clinicians recognize signs of abuse and properly treat patients with adverse events, ranging from psychosis to heart disease, from the drugs. This is the third in a series of articles on drugs including molly/ecstasy and GHB that he wrote to support clinicians. He is currently working on an assessment of synthetic marijuana.

dirty spoon holds 'bath salt' drug