Diabetes

Working Together for Better Public Health

Q&A with Dr. Raul Pino, commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Public Health and a UConn Health board member

Q

What are some of the major public health issues facing Connecticut?

There are many public health issues facing both Connecticut and the nation as a whole. At the Department of Public Health, our emphasis is on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 6|18 initiative, which targets six major health conditions — asthma, high blood pressure, tobacco use, hospital-acquired infections, teen pregnancy, and diabetes — with 18 evidence-based public health interventions.

Each of these conditions is common, preventable, and costly, but importantly, all have proven interventions that can be effectively employed across the health care spectrum to improve both individual and community health, saving lives and dollars. Other areas where I believe we can see good results in Connecticut by employing evidence-based interventions include addressing HIV and the rising number of syphilis cases.


Q

How can physicians assist the DPH daily to address and reduce these issues?

Doctors, particularly primary care physicians, are the main point of contact with the public for health education. We need to engage practitioners in addressing the six major health conditions with their patients — screening for the conditions; educating in advance to enhance prevention of disease; and providing effective, evidence-based treatments when needed. Physicians play a critical role on the front lines of health care to shift our focus from treatment to prevention through lifestyle changes and other healthy choices. They are an indispensable part of the continuum of care between DPH, health care practitioners, and public health.


Q

As DPH commissioner, what drives your daily public health passion and mission?

I am convinced that we — as a nation, a state, and as public health professionals — can do more than we are currently doing to impact public and population health. Addressing the health disparities that continue to plague our population, costing millions of lives and countless health care dollars, is what drives me. We are so fortunate to live in one of the richest countries, and states, in the world, yet we spend so little on public health. My mission is to spread the message that modest investments of money, time, and effort in proven education and prevention methods can lessen these disparities, which will save millions of dollars in health care costs and, more importantly, save lives.


Q

Tell us about your connection to UConn Health and what you hope to accomplish as a member of the board of directors.

I am a 2009 graduate of the UConn Master of Public Health program and receive my own health care at UConn Health. Spending time there for my education and health care has really crystallized for me that UConn Health is the epicenter of clinical care and education in Connecticut. UConn Health is where advances in science and medicine happen, which allows patients to get the best in cutting-edge care. As a member of the board of directors, I am looking to learn and understand better the role that this large institution plays in public health work. I hope my passion for public health and the elimination of health disparities will allow me to give a voice to the importance of integrating education, prevention, public health, and clinical care in order to strengthen our health care system, curb rising health care costs, and foster healthy communities and individuals.

Lab Notes – Spring 2017

For MRSA, Resistance is Futile

UConn medicinal chemists have designed experimental antibiotics that kill Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a common and often deadly bacteria that causes skin, lung, and heart infections. The new antibiotics disable the bacteria’s vitamin B9 enzyme. Without vitamin B9, the bacteria can’t make essential amino acids and they die. Not only do the new antibiotics kill regular MRSA, they also kill types of the bacteria with unusual antibiotic-resistance genes that had never been seen before in the U.S. And that’s no accident: the chemists designed the antibiotics to latch on to the enzyme so cleverly that if it changed enough to elude them, it would no longer be able to do its job with vitamin B9. This could make the new antibiotics resistant to, well, resistance. The research was published in the Dec. 22, 2016 issue of Cell Chemical Biology.

MRSA colonies are shown on a blood agar plate.


State’s Leading Institutions Launch International Effort to Advance Metabolic Research

overweight 3D model running with target on metabolic area

UConn, Yale University, and The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) have partnered with the Weizmann Institute of Science, a prestigious counterpart in Israel, to fill a research void in metabolic diseases that affect billions of people worldwide. The goal of the newly formed Metabolic Research Alliance is to unite the expertise of the institutions on research projects that swiftly move investigations into clinical application and commercialization. The Alliance will employ a novel approach to coordinating existing and new expertise in the areas of immunology, cell biology, microbiota, and the rapidly evolving field of genomics. While investigations will initially focus on obesity and diabetes, the research projects will eventually pursue solutions to additional metabolic diseases.


Innovative Imaging Could Save Sight

Connecticut Innovations has awarded $500,000 to a team of UConn researchers to speed the process to commercialization of the biomarker probe they’re developing to detect a precursor to blindness. The team — led by Royce Mohan, associate professor of neuroscience at UConn Health, and including assistant professor of neuroscience Paola Bargagna-Mohan and UConn School of Pharmacy medicinal chemistry professor Dennis Wright — is developing a fluorescent small molecule imaging reagent to help identify preclinical stages of ocular fibrosis, which is associated with an aggressive form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) that causes rapid vision loss. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the U.S. The method would both enable earlier intervention and allow physicians to monitor the progress and effectiveness of interventions before it’s too late.


DOACs Safer Than Warfarin, Study Shows

Patients who suffered blunt traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) associated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) had significantly lower mortality rates and lower rates of operative intervention compared with a similar group taking warfarin, a study published in the November issue of Trauma and Acute Surgery by researchers from UConn, Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center, and Trinity College shows. Although DOACs have been an increasingly popular alternative to warfarin for anticoagulation, physicians have worried their use might lead to an increase in patient mortality from uncontrollable bleeding, according to the study. The study, based on data on 162 patients in the St. Francis Trauma Quality Improvement Program database, aimed to help close a gap in research on DOAC safety.

bloodclot in vein