Dr. Bruce Brenner

Melanoma Patients Benefit from New Immunotherapy Drug

Microscopic view of a histology specimen of melanoma on human skin tissue

Microscopic view of a histology specimen of melanoma on human skin tissue.


Patients with advanced melanoma are benefiting from the same drug credited recently with the disappearance of the disease in former President Jimmy Carter.

Physicians with UConn Health’s Carole and Ray Neag Comprehensive Cancer Center are successfully boosting the immune system of some of their advanced melanoma patients with a new, promising immunotherapy tool called Keytruda (pembrolizumab).

The drug was granted accelerated FDA approval in September 2014 for the treatment of melanoma patients who no longer respond to other drug treatments and are not candidates for surgery.

Melanoma is one of the deadliest types of skin cancer. If not detected early and removed from the skin, it can spread deep into the skin and to the body’s other organs, such as the lungs, liver, and brain. It is often fatal.

“Melanoma affects the young and the old, and its incidence is on the rise,” says Dr. Upendra P. Hegde, associate professor in the Department of Medicine, and chief medical oncologist for melanoma and cutaneous oncology and head and neck cancer/oral oncology at UConn Health. More than 75,000 people are diagnosed with melanoma annually, and nearly 10,000 Americans die from it each year.

Hegde says melanoma spreads quickly because tumors evade the immune system’s attack by expressing proteins called PD-L1 and PD-L2 (program death ligand 1 and 2), compromising the ability of a person’s T-cells to fight cancer.

However, Keytruda boosts a patient’s immune system, helping it fight back and preventing the cancer-fighting cells from becoming exhausted.

“Keytruda is the first PD-1 inhibitor drug that is allowing us to shrink the melanoma tumors in up to 35 percent of our UConn Health patients,” says Hegde.

Since not all advanced melanoma patients respond to current available drug therapies including Keytruda, UConn Health researchers are participating in two clinical trials that combine Keytruda with other therapy options. One, called INCYTE and led by principal investigator Dr. Jeffrey Wasser, is testing the efficacy of combining Keytruda with another immunotherapy drug known as an IDO1 inhibitor (INCB024360) to see if together they can enhance the immune system’s response to advanced melanoma and other solid-tumor cancers. A second trial is testing the possible benefits of Keytruda with standard chemotherapy for relapsed head and neck cancer.

UConn Health’s multidisciplinary melanoma team includes Dr. Jane Grant-Kels and Dr. Philip Kerr of dermatology, Hegde of medical oncology, and Dr. Bruce Brenner, a surgeon who specializes in melanoma, among others.