Epilepsy

New Neurosurgery Chief Brings Elite Expertise to UConn Health

Dr.Ketan R. Bulsara speaks with patient inside patient room in UConn Health, Farmington CT USA


Dr. Ketan R. Bulsara, a world-renowned neurosurgeon, brings an unparalleled range of expertise in treating neurological disorders to UConn Health as the new chief of the Division of Neurosurgery.

Bulsara came to UConn Health from Yale, where he built successful programs in neurovascular and skull base surgery. He has trained with the pioneers in neurosurgery and is an author on many national and international guidelines
and standards.

Bulsara is among an elite few neurosurgeons in the world with dedicated dual fellowship training in skull base/cerebrovascular microsurgery and endovascular surgery. He is directing both of those disciplines in UConn Health’s Department of Surgery in addition to serving as chief of neurosurgery.

“Dr. Bulsara is a world-class neurosurgeon who brings a level of expertise that is almost unheard of in the field,” says Dr. David McFadden, chair of the UConn Health Department of Surgery. “Whether it’s complex tumors, aneurysms, or any sort of brain- or nerve-related problem, he is well-equipped to offer a full range of treatment options.”

That includes the full spectrum of treatment of both hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke. Bulsara was an early adopter of mechanical thrombectomy, a procedure in which the surgeon removes a clot from a blocked blood vessel going to the brain. Bulsara’s collaboration with UConn Health’s stroke program puts UConn Health in a position to handle these more complex cranial cases.

Bulsara also will be involved in UConn Health’s efforts to expand its epilepsy program to include neurosurgical treatments, and will be recruiting additional neurosurgeons with other areas of expertise.

“It’s always been my dream to establish a world-class destination center for neurosurgical care,” Bulsara says. “Neurosurgery, the way I look at it, is a multidisciplinary specialty. The focus of my division is to optimize patient outcome. We’ll build a team that’s tailored and personalized for every single patient. Ultimately, as a team, we provide the best care for the patients.”

New Neurology Chair Sees UConn’s Possibilities

UConn Health Exterior, Farmington CT


Dr. L. John Greenfield looks forward to helping push UConn Health’s Department of Neurology to the next level as its new chair.

Greenfield, a nationally known epilepsy expert, came to UConn Health in early September from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine, where he also served as chair of neurology. He will also serve as the academic chair of neurology at Hartford Hospital.

“I see a lot of possibilities at UConn,” Greenfield says.

These include goals of establishing an epilepsy monitoring unit, developing a high-density electroencephalography (EEG) facility, and continuing to expand the stroke, neuromuscular, MS, and movement disorders programs.

Because we’re training the next generation of neurologists, we’re focused on … doing research and developing new treatments.

Greenfield’s arrival as UConn Health’s third epilepsy specialist puts the department at a “critical mass for moving things to the next level,” he says.

Previously, UConn Health has relied on Hartford Hospital for inpatient monitoring of epilepsy patients to determine if they are candidates for epilepsy surgery. Greenfield hopes UConn can establish its own unit for the initial phase of the process. He plans for continued and expanded collaboration with neurologists at Hartford Hospital in epilepsy and other areas. Neurologists at UConn and Hartford Hospital already work closely together in training neurology resident physicians and fellows.

UConn Health is also developing a high-density EEG facility, which would be a resource for the region, he says. Traditional EEGs monitor brainwaves using 15-20 electrodes. A high-density EEG involves a special cap with more than 250 contact points, providing more detailed information on where seizures are coming from, along with other potential uses.

The department also plans to hire more doctors to support its successful movement disorders, neuromuscular, MS, and stroke programs, according to Greenfield, while continuing to provide top-quality care in more “bread and butter” neurological disorders, such as chronic headaches.

“The fact that we’re accessible, very highly trained and patient focused, and an academic medical center gives us an edge against our competitors,” Greenfield says. “Because we’re training the next generation of neurologists, we’re focused on not only using the latest techniques and information so we can teach them, and also doing research and developing new treatments.”

The Doctors Are In – Spring 2016

UConn Health welcomes the following new physicians:


Seth Brown, MD

Specialties: Ear, Nose, and Throat/Otolaryngology, Otolaryngology Surgery
Location: Farmington


Saira Cherian, DO

Specialties: Internal Medicine, Primary Care
Locations: Farmington


Alexis Cordiano, MD

Specialty: Emergency Medicine
Location: Farmington


Montgomery Douglas, MD

UConn School of Medicine Chair
of Family Medicine

Specialty: Family Medicine
Location: Farmington


Jeffrey Indes, MD

Chief of the Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery

Specialty: Vascular Surgery
Location: Farmington


Leah Kaye, MD

Specialty: Obstetrics and Gynecology
Location: Farmington


Glenn Konopaske, MD

Specialty: Psychiatry
Location: Farmington


Guoyang Luo, MD

Specialties: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Location: Farmington


Jose Montes-Rivera, MD

Specialties: Neurology, Epilepsy
Location: Farmington


Rafael Pacheco, MD

Specialty: Radiology
Location: Farmington


Mario Perez, MD, MPH

Specialties: Critical Care, Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine
Location: Farmington


Edward Perry, MD

Specialty: Hematology/Oncology
Location: Farmington


Surita Rao, MD

Specialties: Addiction Psychiatry, Psychiatry
Location: Farmington


Belachew Tessema, MD

Specialties: Ear, Nose, and Throat/Otolaryngology, Otolaryngology Surgery
Location: Farmington


Cristina Sánchez-Torres, MD

Specialties: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychiatry
Locations: Farmington, West Hartford


Brian Schweinsburg, Ph.D.

Specialties: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychology
Locations: Farmington, West Hartford


Mona Shahriari, MD

Specialties: Dermatology, Pediatric Dermatology
Locations: Canton, Farmington


Kipp Van Meter, DO

Specialties: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Primary Care
Location: Canton

New Epilepsy Drug May Be Safer, More Effective

A PET scan of human brain

A PET (positron emission tomography) scan shows blood flow and metabolic activity, used to diagnose the cause of epilepsy and for surgical planning.


A new drug that selectively affects potassium channels in the brain may offer effective treatment for epilepsy and prevent tinnitus, UConn neurophysiologist Anastasios Tzingounis and colleagues reported in a recent issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

The existing drugs to treat epilepsy don’t always work, and can have serious side effects. One of the more effective, called retigabine, helps open KCNQ potassium channels, which shut down the signaling of overly excited nerves. Unfortunately, retigabine has significant adverse side effects, including sleepiness, dizziness, problems with urination and hearing, and an unnerving tendency to turn people’s skin and eyes blue. Because of this, it’s usually only given to adults who don’t get relief from other epilepsy drugs.

This drug gives me a better tool to dissect the function of these channels. We need to find solutions for kids – and adults – with [epilepsy].

There are five different kinds of KCNQ potassium channels in the body, but only two are important in epilepsy and tinnitus: KCNQ2 and KCNQ3. The problem with retigabine is that it acts on other KCNQ potassium channels as well, and that’s why it has so many unwanted side effects.

Tzingounis’ research has found that a new drug – SF0034, which is chemically identical to retigabine, except with an extra fluorine atom – seems to open only KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 potassium channels, not affecting KCNQ4 or 5. It was more effective than retigabine at preventing seizures in animals, and it was also less toxic.

The drug company that developed SF0034, SciFluor, now plans to start FDA trials to see whether the drug is safe and effective in people. Treating epilepsy is the primary goal, but tinnitus can be similarly debilitating, and sufferers would welcome a decent treatment.

“This drug gives me another tool, and a better tool, to dissect the function of these channels,” Tzingounis says. “We need to find solutions for kids – and adults – with this problem.”