Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology

Scientists Pave Path for Tackling Rare Cancers

An earlier study by Dr. Andrew Arnold (center) provided the basis for the new research on parathyroid carcinoma genes.

An earlier study by Dr. Andrew Arnold (center) provided the basis for the new research on parathyroid carcinoma genes.


An international team of scientists led by the UConn School of Medicine and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai sequenced a genome for an extremely rare form of cancer, demonstrating the utility of this approach in opening the door for therapy options for rare diseases that are neglected due to scarcity of patients or lack of resources.

The team’s findings were published by JCI Insight, a journal of the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

Leading genomic scientists from UConn, Mount Sinai, and other collaborating institutions performed exome sequencing on tumors and matched normal samples from 17 patients with parathyroid carcinoma, an ultra-rare form of cancer for which there is no effective treatment.

Researchers found several mutations in known cancer-related genes and pathways. This in-depth characterization provides a clear view of genetic mechanisms involved in parathyroid carcinoma and could lead to the first therapy options for patients.

The genetic variants identified in this study have been detected in other cancers and are the subject of ongoing “basket” trials, or clinical trials focused on specific mutations rather than the tissue where the cancer formed.

“This is the largest genomic sequencing study to date for this rare and deadly cancer, and we believe it serves as important validation for using this approach to uncover clinically relevant information in any number of neglected diseases,” said Rong Chen, senior author of the paper and assistant professor in the Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences at Mount Sinai. “Genomic analysis is opening the doors to diseases that could never have been understood through traditional biomedical research because there simply aren’t enough patients to observe.”

Mount Sinai’s work built upon research by Dr. Andrew Arnold of UConn, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2003. In the earlier study, Arnold reported on the first gene discovered in non-familial parathyroid cancer.

“Some of the tumor-specific genomic vulnerabilities we found turn out to be shared with much more common cancers, so drugs already being developed for other cancers may prove valuable in parathyroid cancer,” said Arnold, the study’s co-leader, who serves as the Murray-Heilig Chair in Molecular Medicine, director of the Center for Molecular Medicine, and chief of endocrinology at UConn School of Medicine. “This offers new hope for our patients and serves as a model for approaching other rare and neglected diseases.”

The study was funded by the Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology at Mount Sinai and the Murray-Heilig Fund in Molecular Medicine at UConn School of Medicine through the UConn Foundation.

UConn Health research image of a parathyroid gland (darker) located on the thyroid gland (pink background) during a research experiment where scientists genetically engineered mouse models, knocking out the CDC73 gene to test if cancer would then develop.

UConn Health research image of a parathyroid gland (darker) located on the thyroid gland (pink background) during a research experiment where scientists genetically engineered mouse models, knocking out the CDC73 gene to test if cancer would then develop.