mental illness

Summer Breaks Help Prevent Burnout, Especially Among Physicians

Young man jumps into a body of pristine water on a summer day


It’s summertime, and you need a break! The U.S. has a culture of working too hard, and physicians are some of the worst offenders. Don’t let Labor Day pass without spending at least one afternoon at the beach.

We can joke about it, but there’s rising concern about burnout and depression among physicians. One recent study of 7,000 residents found that 50 percent showed depressive symptoms and 8.1 percent reported suicidal thoughts over a 12-month period.

“Physicians are given enormous workloads, make near-impossible life-and-death decisions regularly, and are expected to be alert and ready to go constantly. It’s unsustainable,” says Dr. Adam Perrin, a professor of family medicine and director of student wellness at UConn Health. “To enjoy life, you need balance and a break.”

Working too much can lead to burnout, or at the very least, a lack of enthusiasm. And that can be bad news not only for doctors, but for patients.

Taking care of yourself is taking care of your patients, too — even when the worst happens.

Studies show that depression and burnout make doctors significantly less likely to read about the next day’s cases, and up to five times more likely to make errors when prescribing medication.

Many doctors work too much because they don’t want to ‘abandon’ their patients. But taking care of yourself is taking care of your patients, too – even when the worst happens. Telling a dying patient that you have a vacation coming up, you regret the timing, and you wanted to tell them how much you care before you leave is very respectful, and patients are usually understanding,
Perrin says.

And while vacations are essential, your recovery and rest shouldn’t center on them. Rest and self-reflection should be a regular pursuit. For example, Perrin sings in a community choir.

“I’ve made many friends, we sing gorgeous music, and it fills the soul,” Perrin says. However you choose to take a break this summer, we hope it does the same for you.

‘Talk to Your Mother’ Proves to be Healthy Advice

Daughter has serious conversation with mother outdoors


Bringing out the proverbial “skeleton in the closet” can provide health benefits, but the degree of benefit depends on who you confide in, says a new UConn study.

The study of 400 people, published in the Journal of Health Psychology, found that people who are living with issues such as mental illness, substance abuse, domestic violence, rape, or childhood abuse reap considerable health benefits from discussing those issues.

But they experience more health benefits – both psychological and physical – from disclosing the issue to mom, a romantic partner, or a best friend than from disclosing it to dad, siblings, or a close colleague, says Diane Quinn, UConn psychology professor and study author.

People have unseen scars and they may be reluctant to talk about their stigmatized identity or experience … but if they do choose to talk about it, then they will gain even more benefit from their social interactions than if they remain silent.

“It seems that people expect their mothers to love them unconditionally, and they just assume that she will handle letting the rest of the family – including the father –know about a problem,” says Quinn.

Researchers studied a group of people who averaged 32 years old and who had at least one past experience that they kept hidden from others.

Participants were asked to rate their social networks according to differing degrees of support. Those ranged from a basic level of support, such as an offer to go to lunch, to more substantial support, such as an offer of a place to stay during an emergency. They were also asked to rate their own physical health, both in terms of actual symptoms of illness and how they perceived their health in general. Finally, they were asked to quantify how “out” they were about their issue within their social network.

Results showed that people who characterized themselves as being the most “out” derived the greatest health benefits, especially when their confidantes included mom, a romantic partner, or a close friend.

“People have unseen scars and they may be reluctant to talk about their stigmatized identity or experience,” says co-author Bradley Weisz, a doctoral student in psychology, “but if they do choose to talk about it, then they will gain even more benefit from their social interactions than if they remain silent.”

But while being “out” about a stigmatized identity or a traumatic experience can be helpful in the long run, Quinn says that not everyone has to follow the same path. “It’s a matter of your personal comfort zone,” she says.

Funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the study was also co-authored by UConn psychology professor Michelle Williams.