neurology

The Power of MRI

A UConn Health physician is seen reviewing an MRI brain scan.

A UConn Health physician is seen reviewing an MRI brain scan. At UConn Health, doctors are pioneering ways to use MRI technology to diagnose and monitor a range of conditions affecting many parts of the body Photo: Peter Morenus


Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has come a long way since the technique was first used in the U.S. in the late 1970s. UConn Health is now taking this powerful, non-invasive imaging tool to the next level.

UConn Health physicians in a variety of specialties are using the technology — which captures images of the inside of the body using a large magnet rather than radiation — in new ways to detect and monitor illnesses.

Prostate Cancer

Dr. Peter Albertsen, chief of UConn Health’s Division of Urology, currently follows 100 patients with localized prostate cancer, which is slow-growing, using advanced multiple-parametric MRI imaging. The technology has now replaced ultrasound as the imaging method of choice for prostate cancer. The technique yields multiple imaging sequences of the prostate, providing information about the anatomy, cellular density measurement, and vascular supply.

There is growing evidence to support the idea that the best treatment plan for low-grade prostate cancer is “watchful waiting” to monitor its progression, instead of immediate surgery or radiation. Albertsen’s practice of active surveillance, and not intervention, for localized prostate cancer was reinforced by a recent long-term study published in September in the New England Journal of Medicine, on which Albertsen served as a consultant.

The technology is extraordinarily helpful, allowing us to avoid invasive biopsy testing and associated risks of bleeding and infection.

Liver Disease

UConn Health is the first in Greater Hartford to use MRI to measure the stiffness of patients’ livers to reveal disease without the need for biopsy. Its MR elastography technique involves placing a paddle on a patient’s skin over the liver during MRI to create vibrations and measure the velocity of the radio waves penetrating the organ. This can indicate a stiffer liver and help diagnose fibrosis, cirrhosis, a fatty liver, or inflammation associated with hepatitis. The initiative is led by Dr. Marco Molina, radiologist in the Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Therapeutics.

“The technology is extraordinarily helpful, allowing us to avoid invasive biopsy testing and associated risks of bleeding and infection,” Molina says. “Plus, with the obesity epidemic, patients developing nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), or fatty liver, can receive earlier diagnosis and take action to reverse their disease’s progression with diet and exercise.”

Breast Cancer

The new Women’s Center at UConn Health has opened its state-of-the-art Beekley Imaging Center, featuring advanced breast cancer screening. Dr. Alex Merkulov, associate professor of radiology and section head of women’s imaging, and his team are conducting research to test the effectiveness of using an abbreviated, five-minute MRI scan to confirm or rule out a breast cancer diagnosis. Typically, an MRI test takes 20 minutes, but researchers are seeing that a briefer MRI scan of just a few minutes can help provide a definitive answer to whether an abnormal breast growth is cancer or not — and potentially help women avoid the biopsy process.

Arthritis

The UConn Musculoskeletal Institute is now researching the use of MRI to assess and map the strength, weakness, and underlying makeup of a patient’s cartilage, especially for those with arthritis. The tool can allow orthopedic experts to identify any thinning or loss of cartilage in the body, which signifies moderate to late-stage disease. In early stages of arthritis, MRI can help pinpoint early morphological and subtle biochemical changes in cartilage.

Neurological Disorders

In neuroradiology, UConn Health is using the power of MRI to differentiate brain tumors, to detect strokes, to assess dementia, to diagnose multiple sclerosis, to evaluate traumatic brain injury, to find the source of epilepsy, and to guide brain surgery. In March 2017, leading neuroradiologist Dr. Leo Wolansky joins UConn Health to advance its research and chair the Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Therapeutics. Wolansky’s neuroimaging research has focused on enhancing understanding of MRI and its contrast agents, especially for multiple sclerosis and brain tumors. He also specializes in the hybrid imaging modality PET-MRI.

“Thanks to the power and advancement of MRI, doctors can see early evidence of disease and seize the opportunity to intervene and improve their patients’ health,” Molina says.

New Neurology Chair Sees UConn’s Possibilities

UConn Health Exterior, Farmington CT


Dr. L. John Greenfield looks forward to helping push UConn Health’s Department of Neurology to the next level as its new chair.

Greenfield, a nationally known epilepsy expert, came to UConn Health in early September from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine, where he also served as chair of neurology. He will also serve as the academic chair of neurology at Hartford Hospital.

“I see a lot of possibilities at UConn,” Greenfield says.

These include goals of establishing an epilepsy monitoring unit, developing a high-density electroencephalography (EEG) facility, and continuing to expand the stroke, neuromuscular, MS, and movement disorders programs.

Because we’re training the next generation of neurologists, we’re focused on … doing research and developing new treatments.

Greenfield’s arrival as UConn Health’s third epilepsy specialist puts the department at a “critical mass for moving things to the next level,” he says.

Previously, UConn Health has relied on Hartford Hospital for inpatient monitoring of epilepsy patients to determine if they are candidates for epilepsy surgery. Greenfield hopes UConn can establish its own unit for the initial phase of the process. He plans for continued and expanded collaboration with neurologists at Hartford Hospital in epilepsy and other areas. Neurologists at UConn and Hartford Hospital already work closely together in training neurology resident physicians and fellows.

UConn Health is also developing a high-density EEG facility, which would be a resource for the region, he says. Traditional EEGs monitor brainwaves using 15-20 electrodes. A high-density EEG involves a special cap with more than 250 contact points, providing more detailed information on where seizures are coming from, along with other potential uses.

The department also plans to hire more doctors to support its successful movement disorders, neuromuscular, MS, and stroke programs, according to Greenfield, while continuing to provide top-quality care in more “bread and butter” neurological disorders, such as chronic headaches.

“The fact that we’re accessible, very highly trained and patient focused, and an academic medical center gives us an edge against our competitors,” Greenfield says. “Because we’re training the next generation of neurologists, we’re focused on not only using the latest techniques and information so we can teach them, and also doing research and developing new treatments.”

The Doctors Are In – Spring 2016

UConn Health welcomes the following new physicians:


Seth Brown, MD

Specialties: Ear, Nose, and Throat/Otolaryngology, Otolaryngology Surgery
Location: Farmington


Saira Cherian, DO

Specialties: Internal Medicine, Primary Care
Locations: Farmington


Alexis Cordiano, MD

Specialty: Emergency Medicine
Location: Farmington


Montgomery Douglas, MD

UConn School of Medicine Chair
of Family Medicine

Specialty: Family Medicine
Location: Farmington


Jeffrey Indes, MD

Chief of the Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery

Specialty: Vascular Surgery
Location: Farmington


Leah Kaye, MD

Specialty: Obstetrics and Gynecology
Location: Farmington


Glenn Konopaske, MD

Specialty: Psychiatry
Location: Farmington


Guoyang Luo, MD

Specialties: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Location: Farmington


Jose Montes-Rivera, MD

Specialties: Neurology, Epilepsy
Location: Farmington


Rafael Pacheco, MD

Specialty: Radiology
Location: Farmington


Mario Perez, MD, MPH

Specialties: Critical Care, Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine
Location: Farmington


Edward Perry, MD

Specialty: Hematology/Oncology
Location: Farmington


Surita Rao, MD

Specialties: Addiction Psychiatry, Psychiatry
Location: Farmington


Belachew Tessema, MD

Specialties: Ear, Nose, and Throat/Otolaryngology, Otolaryngology Surgery
Location: Farmington


Cristina Sánchez-Torres, MD

Specialties: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychiatry
Locations: Farmington, West Hartford


Brian Schweinsburg, Ph.D.

Specialties: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychology
Locations: Farmington, West Hartford


Mona Shahriari, MD

Specialties: Dermatology, Pediatric Dermatology
Locations: Canton, Farmington


Kipp Van Meter, DO

Specialties: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Primary Care
Location: Canton

The Doctors Are In – Winter 2015

UConn Health welcomes the following new physicians:


Ridhi Bansal, MD

Specialties: Internal Medicine, Primary Care
Location: Canton


Philip M. Blumenshine, MD, MAS., M.Sc.

Psychiatry Emergency Department Medical Director

Specialty: Psychiatry
Locations: Farmington


Ethan I. Bortniker, MD

Specialty: Colon Cancer Prevention, Gastroenterology
Location: Farmington


Tilahun Gemtessa, MD, M.Sc.

Specialty: Infectious Diseases
Location: Farmington


Matthew Imperioli, MD

Specialty: Neurology
Location: Farmington


Neha Jain, MD

Specialty: Psychiatry, Geriatric Psychiatry
Location: Farmington


David Karimeddini, MD

Specialty: Radiology
Location: Farmington


Hsung Lin, DMD

Specialty: Family Dentistry
Location: Storrs Center


Janice Oliveri, MD

Specialty: Internal Medicine
Location: Farmington


Houman Rezaizadeh, MD

Specialty: Gastroenterology
Location: Farmington


Bernardo Rodrigues, MD

Speciaty: Neurology
Location: Farmington


Lenora S. Williams, MD

Specialty: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women’s Health
Location: Storrs Center


Visit UConn Health’s online physician directory for information about all our specialists.