neurosurgery

New Neurosurgery Chief Brings Elite Expertise to UConn Health

Dr.Ketan R. Bulsara speaks with patient inside patient room in UConn Health, Farmington CT USA


Dr. Ketan R. Bulsara, a world-renowned neurosurgeon, brings an unparalleled range of expertise in treating neurological disorders to UConn Health as the new chief of the Division of Neurosurgery.

Bulsara came to UConn Health from Yale, where he built successful programs in neurovascular and skull base surgery. He has trained with the pioneers in neurosurgery and is an author on many national and international guidelines
and standards.

Bulsara is among an elite few neurosurgeons in the world with dedicated dual fellowship training in skull base/cerebrovascular microsurgery and endovascular surgery. He is directing both of those disciplines in UConn Health’s Department of Surgery in addition to serving as chief of neurosurgery.

“Dr. Bulsara is a world-class neurosurgeon who brings a level of expertise that is almost unheard of in the field,” says Dr. David McFadden, chair of the UConn Health Department of Surgery. “Whether it’s complex tumors, aneurysms, or any sort of brain- or nerve-related problem, he is well-equipped to offer a full range of treatment options.”

That includes the full spectrum of treatment of both hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke. Bulsara was an early adopter of mechanical thrombectomy, a procedure in which the surgeon removes a clot from a blocked blood vessel going to the brain. Bulsara’s collaboration with UConn Health’s stroke program puts UConn Health in a position to handle these more complex cranial cases.

Bulsara also will be involved in UConn Health’s efforts to expand its epilepsy program to include neurosurgical treatments, and will be recruiting additional neurosurgeons with other areas of expertise.

“It’s always been my dream to establish a world-class destination center for neurosurgical care,” Bulsara says. “Neurosurgery, the way I look at it, is a multidisciplinary specialty. The focus of my division is to optimize patient outcome. We’ll build a team that’s tailored and personalized for every single patient. Ultimately, as a team, we provide the best care for the patients.”

Precise Instruments: Better Spine Surgery with Robots

By Lauren Woods
Photography by Janine Gelineau

Close up of Mazor Robotic Piece


For 30 years, Frank Ditaranto worked in the construction field. But a sudden back injury changed that, leaving Ditaranto unable to carry on his normal life.

“Two years ago, my back went out and it stayed that way,” says Ditaranto, a 50-year-old Terryville, Conn. resident. “Ever since, I have been bent over like I was 90, with shooting pain down my left leg to my toes, and I was unable to even straighten my leg.”

Daily life and even walking became difficult for Ditaranto. He tried pain medicine, physical therapy, aqua therapy, and epidurals, but there was no relief in sight — until now.

On Jan. 7, Dr. Isaac Moss, assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery and neurosurgery at the Comprehensive Spine Center at the UConn Musculoskeletal Institute, was the first surgeon in New England to use the new Mazor Robotics Renaissance Guidance System to assist him during spine surgery. Ditaranto was his first patient.

To relieve Ditaranto’s severe lower-back and leg pain, Moss successfully removed and fused Ditaranto’s deteriorated L4-5 spinal discs using minimally invasive techniques.

“Thanks to the robotic technology, we were able to place screws in the patient’s spine with extremely high accuracy, small incisions, and minimal intraoperative radiation,” says Moss.

UConn Health is the first institution in New England to offer patients this pioneering and more precise robotic guided spine surgery.

A day after the surgery, Ditaranto said he already felt truly transformed: “For the first time I was able to stand up straight and not have pain shooting down my left leg.”

“I am too young to have to live like that,” says Ditaranto. “I now have new discs and hardware in my spine and I am good to go.”

Ditaranto says he feels “great” and looks forward to simply living life pain-free. Perhaps most importantly, as a single dad of a 16-year-old daughter, he most anticipates playing volleyball with her again.

Most spinal procedures like Ditaranto’s involve the attachment of screws and other implants to the spine. Spine surgery has little room for error. Spinal fixations, such as screws, are typically just millimeters away from sensitive spinal nerves, the spinal cord, the aorta, and other critical vessels.

The new technology’s software allows surgeons to plan a patient’s spine surgery virtually, using a 3-D simulation of the spinal anatomy based upon the patient’s most recent CT scan.

“It’s so important to plan in advance of spine surgery,” says Moss. “The Mazor Renaissance technology allows a surgeon to closely review the anatomy of each patient in depth, and get to know the specifics, to make a more precise surgical plan, and eventually execute a smoother operation.”

Once inside the operating room, the Mazor technology matches, in real time, the surgeon’s pre-operative 3-D plan with intra-operative X-ray imaging of the patient’s spine. During the procedure, the technology guides its robotic arm, which is about the size of a soda can, along the spine to help the surgeon pinpoint the precise location to place his tools to ensure the greatest accuracy and safe placement of screws and other hardware into the spine.


Doctors of the UConn Musculoskeletal Institute’s Comprehensive Spine Center use the Mazor Robotics Renaissance Guidance System to perform spine surgery in January.

Doctors of the UConn Musculoskeletal Institute's Comprehensive Spine Center use the Mazor Robotics Renaissance Guidance System to perform spine surgery in January. Janine Gelineau/UConn Health Photo

Dr. Isaac Moss of the UConn Musculoskeletal Institute will be New England’s and Connecticut’s first surgeon to use pioneering robotic guidance technology to assist him during spine surgery at UConn John Dempsey Hospital

Mazor robotic software images- which will help him pinpoint the most precise spot to place screws and other hardware into a patient’s spine.

Orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Isaac Moss uses the Mazor Robotics Renaissance Guidance System to perform spine surgery in January.


UConn Health is using the robotic-guidance technology for a wide range of spinal procedures including biopsies, thoracic and lumbar spinal fusion, and reconstruction for a wide variety of conditions such as scoliosis (abnormal curves in the spinal column), spondylolisthesis (when one vertebra slips forward onto the vertebra below it), tumors, and trauma, among others.

“Using this advanced technology puts UConn Health at the forefront of spinal surgery,” Moss says. “This technology allows us to perform both traditional and minimally invasive spine surgeries more effectively and safely.”

Other potential benefits of the robotic guidance technology include smaller incisions, shorter operative times, shorter hospitalization and recovery, less pain for patients, and less exposure to fluoroscopy X-ray radiation for both a patient and the surgical team.

To refer a patient to a UConn Health surgeon, call 860.679.5555.

Research shows that compared to freehand spine surgery, the robotic guidance technology can increase the accuracy of screws and other hardware placement by 1.5 mm. This increased accuracy may also reduce the potential for neurologic risks to patients, which may include future nerve pain, tingling, or tissue numbness.

Two other UConn Health surgeons in addition to Moss — Dr. Hilary Onyiuke, director of the Comprehensive Spine Center at the UConn Musculoskeletal Institute and chief of the Division of Neurosurgery, and Dr. Ryan Zengou, assistant professor in the Department of Surgery’s Division of Neurosurgery and the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery — plan to use the system.

“I look forward to using this technology to help patients with spinal pathology by performing complex procedures with optimal precision and the best outcomes possible,” Moss says.