pharmacies

When Getting Your Flu Shot, Timing is Everything

Elderly patient being tended to by a nurse


Pharmacies advertising flu vaccinations in August and September are doing their elderly clients a disservice, say UConn Center on Aging researchers. The immunity they gain from vaccine in late summer may wane by the time flu season hits hard in late winter.

As summer temperatures peaked this August, pharmacies were already advertising the influenza vaccine. But if you thought that was too early to be getting a flu shot — you were right.

If you’re interested in volunteering for the study, contact Lisa Kenyon at the UConn Center on Aging at 860.679.3956.

“When adults get the vaccine in September, the peak effect wears off by late December. But flu season peaks in January and February,” warns Laura Haynes, an immunologist and gerontologist at UConn Health.

October or November is a much better time to get the vaccine. That way, you’re still protected when virus season is at its worst.

This is especially important for the elderly, who are at particular risk from flu. People over 65 are much more likely than younger adults to have serious complications or even die from a bout with the virus.

One way to better stimulate the immune response is to administer a high-dose vaccine, which contains four times as much flu antigen as the regular version. But the high-dose vaccine has stronger side effects, is more expensive, and may not be best for everyone.

Haynes and her colleagues at UConn Health, funded by a Program Project Grant from the National Institute on Aging, will run two studies this autumn to better understand older people’s responses to the regular flu vaccine and the high-dose version. The studies will look at how the immune system reacts to the flu vaccine, as well as how to identify patients who would benefit from the high-dose version.