UConn Center on Aging

Aches, Age & Influenza:

What We Know About Flu-Induced Muscle Loss and How to Prevent It

By Kim Krieger

the Flu


Why does age impact flu-related muscle loss, and how can we prevent it? UConn Health researchers are on the case.

Muscle mystery

Most of us have seen it happen to a relative, friend, or patient. A formerly healthy senior gets a bad case of the flu. When they recover, they’re weak from muscle loss, sometimes permanently disabled. We don’t know exactly why the muscle loss happens, but UConn researchers are finding ways to prevent it.

It used to be that losing muscle was just a part of getting old. It’s considered normal aging. You can’t get a drug approved by the FDA to treat aging, because aging isn’t considered a disease. But influenza, the virus that causes the flu, is. If getting the flu speeds up muscle loss in seniors, then muscle loss is potentially preventable. But how could a virus that only infects the lungs cause muscle loss?

Wasting away

When immunologist Laura Haynes first came to UConn Health, she knew that when mice get the flu, they lose weight. In fact, that’s the way researchers can tell that a mouse has the virus. Some mice lose more, some less. Haynes’ work had previously shown that older mice with the flu not only get much sicker, but also lose more weight than younger mice. But as an immunologist, her research focused on how aging immune systems decline. Differences in weight loss were an afterthought. But when she sat down with Dr. George Kuchel, director of the UConn Center on Aging, they made the connection that weight loss might indicate future disability.

Haynes teamed up with kinesiologist Jenna Bartley to further investigate. They confirmed that a significant amount of the weight lost by mice infected with the flu was muscle. And older mice infected with influenza lost more muscle than younger mice, and continued to lose it over a longer period of time.

It’s really hard to improve elderly immune response. So if we can’t prevent them from getting the flu, maybe we could at least prevent muscle loss and future disability.

“In mice there are changes in gene expression in muscle during influenza infection. Genes that degrade muscle go up, genes that build muscle go down. But in young mice, the gene expression goes back to normal more quickly,” says Haynes. The older mice, on the other hand, had higher levels of inflammation, muscle wasting, and atrophy, and it all persisted longer.

Exacerbated muscle loss wasn’t the only problem experienced by the older mice recovering from the flu. They also moved less and took fewer, narrower steps. It was as if they had become frailer and more easily tired. Decreasing gait speed, or how fast someone walks, indicates increasing frailty in humans, and taking narrower steps also increases the risk of falling. [See ‘UConn Pilots Quick Gait-Speed Measurement’]

Haynes and Bartley’s research was the first that directly linked flu-induced inflammation in a controlled setting to muscle atrophy and functional impairment. It was published in the April 2016 issue of the journal Aging. But now that they knew flu really was causing muscle wasting, how could they stop it? Even yearly vaccination doesn’t provide 100-percent protection.

“It’s really hard to improve elderly immune response. So if we can’t prevent them from getting the flu, maybe we could at least prevent muscle loss and future disability,” says Bartley.

Stemming the tide

Haynes and Bartley suspected that influenza-induced inflammation was related to, and possibly the cause of, the destruction of muscle tissue in the elderly mice. They theorized that if they could stem the tide of inflammation in the body, they might prevent the muscle tissue from degrading so much. But there was a catch: inflammation helps mobilize the immune system. If you block inflammation totally, you block the body’s defense against the flu virus. So Haynes and Bartley needed a more subtle tool.

In mice there are changes in gene expression in muscle during influenza infection. Genes that degrade muscle go up, genes that build muscle go down. But in young mice, the gene expression goes back to normal more quickly.

The first drugs Bartley and Haynes found that might be good candidates are COX-2 inhibitors. They’re non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, like aspirin and ibuprofen, but COX-2 inhibitors are very specific. They block just one molecule in the body’s web of inflammatory responses. Other researchers have shown that COX-2 inhibitors can slow muscle wasting in cancer patients. And most importantly, COX-2 inhibitors don’t seem to block the body’s antiviral immune reaction.

Haynes and Bartley are currently testing the COX-2 inhibitors to see if they prevent muscle loss in geriatric mice after the flu. They’re also testing whether improving immune memory of the flu in mice — that is, vaccinating them — protects them against muscle wasting.

Their work is intriguing, but Kuchel cautions that adult humans are more complicated than lab mice.

“Factors that may contribute to an older individual becoming more vulnerable to losing muscle function during or after flu infection are complex but may include a sedentary lifestyle, slow walking speed at baseline, low muscle mass, poor nutrition, plus chronic inflammation as a result of any number of chronic infections, being frail, etc.,” he says.

Bartley and Haynes agree. They’re applying for more grant money to explore how COX-2 inhibitors interact with other factors such as exercise. And they hope to eventually test muscle-protection strategies in people. Because while influenza is one of the most common serious infections in the elderly, it probably isn’t alone in causing muscle wasting.

“We’re trying to establish the relationship between any infection and inflammation, and how it leads to muscle loss and disability,” says Bartley. “Overall, we’re trying to help people get better and stay stronger for longer.”

Lab Notes – Fall 2016

‘Morrbid’ RNA Could Be Key to Asthma Treatment

No.2 Pencil eraser erasing a piece of an RNA strand

Researchers have discovered a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory disorders that are characterized by abnormal myeloid cell lifespan, such as asthma, Churg-Strauss syndrome, and hypereosinophilic syndrome. Investigators including Adam Williams of UConn Health and The Jackson Laboratory named the novel long non-coding RNA ‘Morrbid’ (Myeloid RNA Regulator of Bim-Induced Death). They discovered that Morrbid tightly controls how long circulating myeloid cells live — which is key to maintaining the balance between fighting infection and exacerbating inflammation — by overriding a signaling mechanism that prevents premature immune cell death. In mice, deleting the gene helped protect them against inflammation and immunopathology. The findings were published online in Nature, Aug. 15, 2016.


Parents Living Longer is Good News for Offspring, Study Says

Father and young son laugh together and hug

A new study led by the University of Exeter and co-authored by the UConn Center on Aging, among other international contributors, shows that how long a person’s parents live can help predict how long the offspring will live, and how healthy the child will be as he or she ages. The study of 186,000 participants, aged 55 to 73 years and followed for up to eight years, is the largest of its kind. It found that a person’s chance of survival increased by 17 percent for each decade that at least one parent lived beyond age 70, and that those with longer-lived parents had lower rates of heart disease and other circulatory conditions, as well as cancer. The study was published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Aug. 15, 2016.


PRP Limits Ill Effects of Osteoarthritis Treatment

red blood cells

Giving platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to patients undergoing treatment for osteoarthritis may limit the negative effects of the drugs used to manage their symptoms, according to a new study led by Dr. Augustus Mazzocca, director of the UConn Musculoskeletal Institute, and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Osteoarthritis is the most common chronic condition of the joints, causing pain, stiffness, and swelling in approximately 27 million Americans. Powerful anti-inflammatory medicines and local anesthetics relieve pain and improve range of motion, but can also lead to tissue degeneration. In the study, published in the August issue of The American Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers found combining PRP with these treatments significantly reduced their toxic effect on the cells and even improved their proliferation.


Bath Salts 101: Pharmacist Explains Party Drugs

Synthetic party drugs with dangerous hallucinogenic properties, such as those sold commercially as “bath salts,” continue to pose a significant public health risk around the country. C. Michael White — head of the Department of Pharmacy Practice in UConn’s School of Pharmacy — published a comprehensive review of synthetic cathinones in the June 2016 issue of The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology to help clinicians recognize signs of abuse and properly treat patients with adverse events, ranging from psychosis to heart disease, from the drugs. This is the third in a series of articles on drugs including molly/ecstasy and GHB that he wrote to support clinicians. He is currently working on an assessment of synthetic marijuana.

dirty spoon holds 'bath salt' drug

Blood Test Can Alert Doctors to Delirium Risk

artsy photo depicting two nurses walking down hospital corridor in the view point of someone experiencing the effects of confusion or delirium


Researchers at UConn Health and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have found that a blood test could make it easier to identify patients at risk for delirium, the sudden, acute state of confusion that most often affects older adults and incurs $6.9 billion in medical costs each year in the U.S. Their study, published online in The Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, reports that elevated blood levels of specific proteins called cytokines can hint that a patient will develop delirium during a hospital stay.

If you do things such as improve a patient’s vision and hearing, reorient them to where they are regularly, promote restful sleep, increase mobility, and stop medications that could be making the delirium worse, all that can help.

Dr. George Kuchel, director of the UConn Center on Aging and one of the authors of the study, says the suspected blood signature for delirium shows two cytokines at higher-than-normal levels in patients who develop delirium. Both cytokines are associated with inflammation.

Researchers don’t yet know exactly how inflammation and delirium are linked. The two cytokines the researchers saw in the blood signature, interleukin-6 and interleukin-2, can cause swelling of the membrane around the brain. Chronic stress from low-level illness can also elevate both cytokines and stress hormones such as cortisol, which over the long term can shrink part of the brain and perhaps increase an elderly person’s susceptibility to delirium.

Kuchel and his colleagues worked with patients who participated in the Successful Aging after Elective Surgery (SAGES) study to get a better handle on the relationship between inflammation and delirium. This large study, sponsored by the National Institute on Aging, has been following 566 surgical patients over the age of 70 for the past five years, with the goal of finding new approaches to prevent delirium and its long-term consequences in older adults.

The UConn study found that patients who developed delirium had higher levels of interleukin-2 than non-delirium patients at all times they were tested: before surgery, in the first two days afterward, and one month later.

This is the first study to look at cytokine levels in older surgical patients at several points in time, both before and after surgery. The results need to be replicated in other studies, but if they prove to be generally true, the blood signature could provide a quick way to alert doctors and nurses to seniors at higher risk of delirium. They can then take extra precautions to keep the patients oriented.

“If you do things such as improve a patient’s vision and hearing, reorient them to where they are regularly, promote restful sleep, increase mobility, and stop medications that could be making the delirium worse, all that can help,” says Kuchel.

When Getting Your Flu Shot, Timing is Everything

Elderly patient being tended to by a nurse


Pharmacies advertising flu vaccinations in August and September are doing their elderly clients a disservice, say UConn Center on Aging researchers. The immunity they gain from vaccine in late summer may wane by the time flu season hits hard in late winter.

As summer temperatures peaked this August, pharmacies were already advertising the influenza vaccine. But if you thought that was too early to be getting a flu shot — you were right.

If you’re interested in volunteering for the study, contact Lisa Kenyon at the UConn Center on Aging at 860.679.3956.

“When adults get the vaccine in September, the peak effect wears off by late December. But flu season peaks in January and February,” warns Laura Haynes, an immunologist and gerontologist at UConn Health.

October or November is a much better time to get the vaccine. That way, you’re still protected when virus season is at its worst.

This is especially important for the elderly, who are at particular risk from flu. People over 65 are much more likely than younger adults to have serious complications or even die from a bout with the virus.

One way to better stimulate the immune response is to administer a high-dose vaccine, which contains four times as much flu antigen as the regular version. But the high-dose vaccine has stronger side effects, is more expensive, and may not be best for everyone.

Haynes and her colleagues at UConn Health, funded by a Program Project Grant from the National Institute on Aging, will run two studies this autumn to better understand older people’s responses to the regular flu vaccine and the high-dose version. The studies will look at how the immune system reacts to the flu vaccine, as well as how to identify patients who would benefit from the high-dose version.