UConn Health

A New Era

The New Uconn Health Patient Care Tower


During the early morning hours of May 13, 300 UConn Health doctors, nurses, staff, leaders, and volunteers mobilized to begin the carefully planned move of 70 inpatients, one by one, to UConn John Dempsey Hospital’s new patient care tower.

The new tower, which along with the original hospital building comprises the hospital, was designed with the latest, most advanced technology and patient safety, comfort, and privacy at the forefront. The aesthetic is made to be peaceful and healing, with soothing colors, earth-toned wood and tile, noise reduction features, and tons of natural light thanks to floor-to-ceiling windows throughout.

The tower is the biggest project of Bioscience Connecticut, the initiative launched by Gov. Dannel Malloy in 2011 to make Connecticut a leader in bioscience research and create new jobs. In addition to staff jobs at UConn Health, the project created more than 5,000 construction jobs.

“I am extremely impressed,” said patient Dr. Michael P. Kruger, who graduated from UConn School of Medicine’s orthopaedic residency program in the 1980s, after he was moved to the new facility. The private rooms are the biggest perk for any patient, Kruger said.

“Having a facility where you get the privacy — when doctors come in to talk to me, I don’t have to share the information with the guy next door — it makes a big difference, I think, in how you recover and what the outcome’s going to be,” he said.

We are great at what we do, but we are going to do it even better in the new tower.

Not to mention the state-of-the-art technology in the 11-floor, over 381,000-square-foot “hospital of the future.”

The Operating Suite is home to the da Vinci robot and the Mazor Robotics Renaissance Guidance System, the only one of its kind in New England for robotic-guided spine surgery. The suite includes 10 operating rooms, each with LED boom lighting, special rubber floors and air filtration systems for infection control, high-definition Black Diamond Video systems for enhanced surgical vision, live-broadcasting for medical education and physician training, and real-time communication with the Department of Pathology.

A 1,200-square-foot hybrid operating room will open this fall, equipped with advanced imaging capabilities for minimally invasive and complex procedures.

Four high-tech smart robots called TUGS will deliver pharmacy medications to nursing units across the hospital, along with high-speed, wall-based tube systems.

Other safety measures include a centralized monitoring system, allowing patients to be observed remotely 24 hours a day by technicians, in addition to traditional bedside monitoring by their nurses. And those nurses will be able to reach patients even faster if anything happens, thanks to Rauland Responder bedside call systems.

“The technology that we are now able to use for our patients is going to enhance the care that we deliver,” said Anne Sakitis, nurse manager of the orthopaedic surgery floor. “We are great at what we do, but we are going to do it even better in the new tower.”

The tower has six inpatient floors dedicated to intensive care, intermediate care, medicine, oncology, orthopaedic surgery, and general surgery, and 169 private patient rooms, including 28 private rooms in the intensive care unit. Each room honors one of Connecticut’s towns with a scenic nature photograph taken in that town by a local photographer, and features a view of the Farmington Valley, a high-tech bed and monitoring equipment, a private bathroom, and a couch that turns into a bed for visitors. The hospital now has 24/7 visiting hours.

The Emergency Department includes more than 40 patient rooms and five patient care zones, ranging from fast-track care for minor emergencies to advanced trauma care. It has onsite CT scan and X-ray, decontamination and resuscitation rooms, and an emergency dental chair.

The new tower is also home to a dedicated Dialysis Care Center, a Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, a Respiratory Therapy Department, and a physical/occupational therapy and rehabilitation gym. There are more than 80 ceiling lifts located throughout the hospital for safe patient handling.

“This tower represents a new era at UConn Health and for health care in our state. The opening of the new hospital tower is a very special generational milestone,” said UConn John Dempsey Hospital CEO Anne Diamond. “We did it! We dreamed it, we built it, and now we’ve opened it.”


Gallery: Inside the New Tower

A patient and staff are seen inside the Emergency Department waiting area. A children’s play area is inside opaque glass walls.

A UConn Health nurse shows a patient how to adjust her bed in a room on the sixth floor of the UConn Health new tower. It's open and spacious and large windows
Dr. David McFadden, surgeon-in-chief, gives direction in one of 10 new operating rooms. The room is equipped with a Black Diamond video camera, near top left, which allows surgeons to view a close-up video of procedures. Additional screens allow doctors to compare video to radiology scans to enhance precision.

The Doctors Are In – Spring 2016

UConn Health welcomes the following new physicians:


Seth Brown, MD

Specialties: Ear, Nose, and Throat/Otolaryngology, Otolaryngology Surgery
Location: Farmington


Saira Cherian, DO

Specialties: Internal Medicine, Primary Care
Locations: Farmington


Alexis Cordiano, MD

Specialty: Emergency Medicine
Location: Farmington


Montgomery Douglas, MD

UConn School of Medicine Chair
of Family Medicine

Specialty: Family Medicine
Location: Farmington


Jeffrey Indes, MD

Chief of the Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery

Specialty: Vascular Surgery
Location: Farmington


Leah Kaye, MD

Specialty: Obstetrics and Gynecology
Location: Farmington


Glenn Konopaske, MD

Specialty: Psychiatry
Location: Farmington


Guoyang Luo, MD

Specialties: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Location: Farmington


Jose Montes-Rivera, MD

Specialties: Neurology, Epilepsy
Location: Farmington


Rafael Pacheco, MD

Specialty: Radiology
Location: Farmington


Mario Perez, MD, MPH

Specialties: Critical Care, Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine
Location: Farmington


Edward Perry, MD

Specialty: Hematology/Oncology
Location: Farmington


Surita Rao, MD

Specialties: Addiction Psychiatry, Psychiatry
Location: Farmington


Belachew Tessema, MD

Specialties: Ear, Nose, and Throat/Otolaryngology, Otolaryngology Surgery
Location: Farmington


Cristina Sánchez-Torres, MD

Specialties: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychiatry
Locations: Farmington, West Hartford


Brian Schweinsburg, Ph.D.

Specialties: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychology
Locations: Farmington, West Hartford


Mona Shahriari, MD

Specialties: Dermatology, Pediatric Dermatology
Locations: Canton, Farmington


Kipp Van Meter, DO

Specialties: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Primary Care
Location: Canton

Lab Notes – Winter 2015

Cancer Cells Unreceptive to Vitamin D

Many human colon cancers may not express receptors for vitamin D, limiting vitamin D’s protective role against colon cancer to the early stages of the disease, report Charles Giardina and colleagues at UConn’s Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and Center for Molecular Medicine in the April 14 issue of Cancer Prevention Research. The researchers observed that adenomas in the colons of mice tended to repress vitamin D receptors, while having elevated Class I histone deacetylases (HDAC). However, HDAC inhibitors may reactivate the vitamin D receptors. They propose that vitamin D could still be protective against colon cancer, but how its receptors are expressed and inhibited in cancer cells needs more examination. Read the article at Cancer Prevention Research.

a group of vitamin D suppliments


Rogue X Chromosomes Uncovered in Farmington

Humans only need the genes from one X chromosome to be healthy. The extra one gets trussed up and shut down in the earliest stages of development. But female human embryonic stem cells growing in the lab sometimes reactivate their second X. They express extra genes, fouling up experiments and scuttling potential therapies. Now, researchers including UConn’s Marc Lalande and a team from Paris Diderot University have found a marker, and potentially a mechanism, for how the extra X reactivates – and they have an idea on how to prevent it. They describe their findings in the May 7 issue of Cell Stem Cell.


Friends are Unreliable Sources for Drinking Studies

In recent years, researchers have turned to friends of people in alcohol studies to verify what the subjects report about their drinking habits. People in the same social situations are sought out, in part, because of the inherent impairment caused by alcohol. But according to a UConn study published in Addictive Behaviors, friends don’t seem to provide any new information. In fact, they typically underreport what their acquaintances consume. The finding supports the so-called “protective effect” of friends described in other research. A growing availability of other evidence – hair and fingernail samples, for example – may provide better strategy for corroborating the amount of alcohol study subjects consume, says author Michael Fendrich, associate dean of the School of Social Work.


She Smells Him, She Smells Him Not

Mice rely on their noses to help them navigate the world. But high levels of progesterone “blind” receptors in the noses of female mice to male pheromones, UConn Health’s John Peluso and other colleagues, led by Dr. Lisa Stowers of The Scripps Research Institute, report in the June 4 issue of Cell. Female mice have high levels of progesterone during the infertile phase of their reproductive cycles, and tend to be indifferent or even aggressive toward males. But during the fertile phase, progesterone levels drop and estrogen rises, and their nasal receptors again respond to male pheromones, the researchers found. Female mice in their fertile phase are friendly and sexually receptive towards males – perhaps because they can smell them.

mouse

Honor Roll – Winter 2015

For the second consecutive year, UConn Health has received a Gold Award from Get With The Guidelines, an American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association initiative that recognizes hospitals for providing exceptional care to heart-attack victims according to evidence-based guidelines.


UConn Health psychiatrist Dr. Kristina Zdanys was voted onto the Medical and Scientific Advisory Council for the Connecticut Alzheimers Association in June. She will join colleagues Rick Fortinsky and Dr. Lavern Wright, who also sit on the council.


Hartford Magazine’s 2015 list of Best Doctors in Connecticut includes 53 UConn Health faculty members. See the list of cited UConn docs at UConn Today.

The Doctors Are In – Winter 2015

UConn Health welcomes the following new physicians:


Ridhi Bansal, MD

Specialties: Internal Medicine, Primary Care
Location: Canton


Philip M. Blumenshine, MD, MAS., M.Sc.

Psychiatry Emergency Department Medical Director

Specialty: Psychiatry
Locations: Farmington


Ethan I. Bortniker, MD

Specialty: Colon Cancer Prevention, Gastroenterology
Location: Farmington


Tilahun Gemtessa, MD, M.Sc.

Specialty: Infectious Diseases
Location: Farmington


Matthew Imperioli, MD

Specialty: Neurology
Location: Farmington


Neha Jain, MD

Specialty: Psychiatry, Geriatric Psychiatry
Location: Farmington


David Karimeddini, MD

Specialty: Radiology
Location: Farmington


Hsung Lin, DMD

Specialty: Family Dentistry
Location: Storrs Center


Janice Oliveri, MD

Specialty: Internal Medicine
Location: Farmington


Houman Rezaizadeh, MD

Specialty: Gastroenterology
Location: Farmington


Bernardo Rodrigues, MD

Speciaty: Neurology
Location: Farmington


Lenora S. Williams, MD

Specialty: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women’s Health
Location: Storrs Center


Visit UConn Health’s online physician directory for information about all our specialists.