UConn School of Dental Medicine

UConn Health Offers Largest Emergency Dental Service in CT

patient in dental chair

UConn Health sees an average of 60 dental emergencies in a 24-hour period.


Dental emergencies can strike at any time. That’s why UConn Health has offered around-the-clock coverage for dental emergencies since the early 1970s and recently opened a specialized patient room within the new emergency department at UConn John Dempsey Hospital.

“We have the largest dental emergency service in the state,” says Dr. Steven Lepowsky, senior associate dean for education and patient care at the UConn School of Dental Medicine. “The service exists to address a significant unmet need.”

Even those who receive regular dental care can face emergency situations at any time. On average, UConn Health sees nearly 60 dental emergencies in 24 hours. The most common are toothaches related
to a cavity, root canal, or abscess.

On weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., urgent dental care is provided by students and residents from the UConn School of Dental Medicine who staff UConn Health’s dental clinics under faculty supervision.

The training component makes the emergency dental service a crucial piece of the dental school’s academic mission.

The service exists to address a significant unmet need.

“It helps the students and residents build skills in terms of how to diagnose a problem quickly, identify the source of the problem, and provide care that immediately addresses someone’s needs,” Lepowsky says.
After 10 p.m., patients who present with a dental emergency are assessed by medical staff, who can bring in the dental resident on call, if necessary.

Although the hours are nothing new, the after-hours setting is.

The new room and dental chair “replicate a full dental operatory, so it expanded the scope of what we could offer on an emergency basis after hours,” Lepowsky says. “It’s a much more pleasant environment for the patient.”

It’s not, however, meant to replace primary dental care, according to Lepowsky.

Sometimes, after-hours care involves just relieving pain and sending the patient home, asking them to return in the morning when the dental clinics open for a specific dental treatment.

“You want someone to have an established relationship with a dental provider so there’s someone coordinating all their annual dental health care and maintenance needs,” Lepowsky says.

UConn Writes New Prescription for Medical Education

academic entrance, UConn Health Farmington CT
Inside UConn Health Farmington CT, rotunda

The exterior (Top) and interior (Bottom) of the new Academic Rotunda at UConn Health. Photo: Janine Gelineau


The class of 2020 is not only the largest in UConn School of Medicine history, it’s also the first to experience a newly launched, innovative curriculum to better prepare doctors for the rapidly changing health care landscape.

The new curriculum, known as MDelta — Making a Difference in Education, Learning, and Teaching Across the curriculum — is based on the principles of lifelong learning, patient-centered care, and collaborative teamwork.

A cutting-edge holistic assessment program provides time for students to evaluate their competencies as they reach milestones in their development.

“Medicine and the health care landscape is changing rapidly, with the explosion of clinical information and technology, the development of complex health care systems, a move from inpatient to outpatient care settings, and the rise of team science,” says Dr. Bruce T. Liang, dean of the UConn School of Medicine. “Our new curriculum is a platform to make our students the best possible future doctors and prepare them to be health care leaders,” he says.

Rather than traditional classroom lectures, the new curriculum relies heavily on team-based learning, in addition to anatomy dissection, virtual laboratory experiences (including the use of four Anatomage virtual anatomy tables), clinical practice, and simulation.

A novel course called VITALS — Vertically Integrated Teams Aligned in Learning and Scholarship — brings together teams of students from across all years of the medical school and professional schools, such as the UConn School of Dental Medicine, to learn together about health care policy, population health, ethics, and current events affecting local and global communities.

At the start of medical school, each student is assigned to a primary care physician in an outpatient practice at UConn Health or in the surrounding community across the state to follow the health of patients over three years. In addition, teams are assigned to a “Clinical Home” in one of UConn’s affiliate teaching hospitals to learn how to work in a health care system caring for a diverse population. These opportunities prepare students for more advanced clinical experiences — both inpatient and outpatient — later in medical school.

Thanks to the American Medical Association selecting UConn as a member of its Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium, students will also be trained in the electronic medical record.

“Early clinical and health system exposure is an integral part of the new curriculum, along with inter-professional activities,” says Dr. Suzanne Rose, senior associate dean for education at UConn’s medical school. “A cutting-edge holistic assessment program provides time for students to evaluate their competencies as they reach milestones in their development.”

And because of investments from UConn Health and the state of Connecticut through the Bioscience Connecticut initiative, the 100 medical and 49 dental students are also the first to learn in a new 17,000-square-foot facility featuring a renovated academic entrance and a brand-new, high-tech rotunda.

Honor Roll – Spring 2016

UConn John Dempsey Hospital earned an ‘A’ in patient safety for fall 2015 from premier nonprofit hospital safety advocate The Leapfrog Group.


Dr. Robert L. Trestman is a co-recipient of the 2016 Manfred S. Guttmacher Award from the American Psychiatric Association and the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL) for his outstanding contributions to the literature of forensic psychiatry.


Dr. Pamela Moore was named Best Doctor in the Willimantic Chronicle’s 2015 Readers’ Choice Awards.


The UConn School of Dental Medicine was named winner of the 2016 William J. Gies Award for Outstanding Achievement by an Academic Dental Institution.


Reinhard C. Laubenbacher, Ph.D., of UConn Health and The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) for Genomic Medicine has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and co-editor of the Bulletin of Mathematical Biology.


Dr. Bruce Strober and Dr. Jane Grant-Kels were honored with Presidential Citations by the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) at its annual meeting in Washington, D.C. on March 3.