Ultrasound

On the Ground for Breast Cancer Awareness

breast cancer screening


Rashea Banks’ first patient at Community Health Services, a federally qualified community health center in Hartford’s North End, was a woman who lost several family members to breast cancer.

The woman, a Latina, said she wanted to get a mammogram, but did not know where to go.

“This woman’s experience, and others, are fueling my determination, ambition, and passion to reach as many women as possible and navigate them through early detection in order to prevent diagnosis at a later stage of breast cancer,” Banks said shortly after she started as UConn Health’s Community Breast Navigator in September 2015.

Visit UConn Health for information on UConn Health’s Breast Cancer Program.

Today, Banks has provided one-on-one counseling about breast cancer and the significance of early detection to more than 300 uninsured and underinsured women. She has referred 120 for breast screenings, resulting in 61 women receiving mammograms and/or ultrasounds at UConn Health.

Banks’ position with The Carole and Ray Neag Comprehensive Cancer Center is grant-funded by Susan G. Komen Southern New England to help raise awareness of early detection among high-risk African American and Latino women. Breast cancer in this population often tends to be more aggressive, more difficult to treat, and more deadly. Fortunately, there have been no breast cancer diagnoses among the women she has helped thus far.

Anyone who visits Community Health Services in Hartford and, more recently, Community Health Center, Inc. in New Britain, has the option to receive free breast cancer counseling and free breast screenings through UConn Health’s Breast Navigation Program. Banks also scans the providers’ schedules every day, looking for patients who have not had a mammogram in the past year, and has the provider tell the patients she would like to talk to them at the end of their visit and enroll them in the program for a free mammogram. Other times, providers will identify patients who do not have health insurance and may have never had a mammogram, and will ask Banks to talk to them.

A lot of women are not aware that they may be at high risk for breast cancer. As a fellow African American woman who was raised in an inner-city community, I think it is so important to raise awareness of breast cancer directly in the community.

For those women choosing to receive breast screenings, Banks tracks their experience and, if any abnormalities are detected, connects them with UConn Health’s Breast Nurse Navigator Molly Tsipouras at The Carole and Ray Neag Comprehensive Cancer Center in Farmington for further access to treatment.

“A lot of women are not aware that they may be at high risk for breast cancer,” says Banks, who is currently pursuing her Master of Public Health degree at UConn. “As a fellow African American woman who was raised in an inner-city community, I think it is so important to raise awareness of breast cancer directly in the community.”

Banks and UConn Health’s Breast Navigation Program continue to do community outreach in the Hartford area at health fairs, walks and races, and expos.

Along with breast surgeon Dr. Christina E. Stevenson, Banks plans to present on the success of UConn Health’s Community Breast Navigation program at The San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium this December to encourage other cancer centers nationally to do similar outreach in their communities to help further the fight against breast cancer.