To Our Readers

UConn Health Journal magazines


Two years ago, we published the first UConn Health Journal with the goal of giving physicians, dentists, and the public insight into the groundbreaking research and life-changing clinical care happening at UConn Health. As an academic medical center, UConn Health makes the discoveries that shape the future of health care. Our scientists work to understand medicine’s biggest mysteries, design new therapies and treatments, and turn laboratory breakthroughs into advances in patient care.

As our team collaborates to produce each issue, I constantly find myself in awe of everything that drives UConn Health’s innovations. Our stories can be heavy on science or heavy on heart, sometimes in the same issue. This spring, the story “Aches, Age, and Influenza” told of how UConn scientists’ findings in mice may help us prevent influenza-related muscle deterioration in the elderly. In the same edition, we got to know 11-year-old Alyssa Temkin, who since birth has struggled with an unforgiving, deadly disease for which a new UConn doctor is closing in on a cure.

Most of the time, though, our stories walk the line between the two. Because when it comes down to it, these advancements are based on science. But by definition, medical discoveries always impact real people. The mission of UConn Health Journal, like that of the UConn Health enterprise, is to translate that research: What does it mean for you? For your patients? For your loved ones?

In this issue, we’re exploring one topic from several angles. The brain has for centuries fascinated and perplexed. The more we learn about it, the more we find there is left to discover. At UConn, those who work with the brain range from a neurologist with a ringside seat to the evolution of concussion treatment to a radiologist and medical physicist who harnessed 3-D printing technology to give surgeons a practice brain for complicated procedures.

And please, let us know what you think and what else you’d like to read about. Email me anytime at julie.bartucca@uconn.edu.

Thanks for reading,
Julie Bartucca
Editor, UConn Health Journal


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