Author: yec14002

School of Medicine Reaccredited

Through a vote at an October 2018 meeting, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) accredited the University of Connecticut School of Medicine medical education program for another eight-year term.

The School of Medicine was deemed satisfactory in 92 of the 93 elements and compliant with all 12 standards of the accreditation criteria by the LCME, which is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as the authority for the accreditation of medical education programs.

“We are pleased with this positive outcome and would like to thank the various faculty and staff members who were so instrumental in this remarkable achievement,” says Dr. Bruce T. Liang, dean of the School of Medicine, who directed the effort to prepare for the accreditation of the medical education program.

“Since a new curriculum was recently introduced, there are several elements that will continue to be monitored, but we are committed to working diligently toward strengthening the program even further.”

Follow-Up

Research doesn’t stop when we report it. Here are updates on past UConn Health Journal stories:


Hearing Loss

UConn Health otolaryngologist Dr. Kourosh Parham and his colleagues are collaborating with French pharmaceutical company Sensorion to develop a blood test that can warn patients and their doctors of early damage to the inner ear, before hearing loss is noticeable. Parham and his colleagues report in Hearing Research that levels of prestin, a protein found only in cells in the inner ear, rise sharply when those cells are damaged and start to die. Currently, hearing loss can only be identified after it has occurred.

Physician-scientist Dr. Kourosh Parham looks in patients ear

Fall 2016, “Detecting Vertigo, Hearing Loss via Blood Tests”


Health Disparities

Men and boys of color in Connecticut are less likely to have health insurance, more likely to be victims of violence, and more likely to die early from preventable diseases than their non-Hispanic white counterparts, UConn’s Health Disparities Institute reports in its inaugural Connecticut Report Card on Health Equity Among Men and Boys of Color. The report identifies social experiences that can negatively impact health in the population, as well as actions the state can take to address the disparities. Read more at UConn Today.

young black father looks over his ailing son on a hospital

Summer 2018, “Bridging the Health Care Gap”

Forming Alliances to Build a Better Care Model

In her first year as dean of the UConn School of Dental Medicine, Dr. Sharon Gordon seeks to apply the concept of interprofessional learning to shape the future of health care.

Cloe Poisson, Copyright © 2019. Hartford Courant. Used with permission.
Cloe Poisson, Copyright © 2019. Hartford Courant. Used with permission.


As medicine moves toward an integrated approach to care, UConn’s new dental dean sees a greater role for dental medicine in the delivery of that care, and a strong foundation already in place to make that happen.

Dr. Sharon Gordon, who arrived from the East Carolina School of Dental Medicine last summer, says it’s part of what drew her to UConn: more broadly, the rich history of partnership between the medical and dental schools, but notably the basic sciences curriculum they share in the first two years, focusing on interprofessional training.

“We’re perfectly poised to move to the next steps, which would be providing clinical care together,” she says. “The idea is students moving into the clinics together, learning how to take care of patients together, so when they graduate they will be prepared for interprofessional practice.”

The evidence shows that more comprehensive care of the patient gives better health outcomes overall.

Health care financing already is trending toward a more holistic view of the patient and greater emphasis on outcomes; a next step is recognition of the connection between oral health and
overall health, Gordon says.

“Thinking about dentistry and where it is on the spectrum of reimbursement, if we don’t embrace that, we’re going to be left behind,” Gordon says. “But more importantly, the evidence shows that more comprehensive care of the patient gives better health outcomes overall.”

To help UConn Health get there, Gordon wants to continue building on the concept of students working in group-practice clusters in the clinic. A program fittingly known as CONNcept (Connecticut Comprehensive Education and Practice Team), established under the leadership of Gordon’s predecessor, Dr. R. Lamont “Monty” MacNeil, aims to simulate a true practice setting. As part of this, Gordon’s vision also includes incorporating nursing students, students from Tunxis Community College’s dental hygienist program, and, eventually, expanded-function dental assistants. Collectively, these disciplines can train together and, ultimately, practice together, improving patient outcomes through this new model of care.

Trauma Director Puts Patients First

Emergency vehicle heading towards an emergency room


As he marks his first year as Medical Director of Trauma at UConn Health, Dr. Ryan Millea hasn’t lost focus on what drives him, whether responding at a moment’s notice to the surgical needs of a car accident victim or to an intensive care patient with a life-threatening gastrointestinal burst.

“My philosophy is to always deliver patient-centered care,” says Millea, who is also a general and critical care surgeon. “I’m very hands-on to improve a patient’s overall experience. No one likes being sick, so I try to make things as seamless and smooth as possible from preoperative care to recovery.”

I’m very hands-on to improve a patient’s overall experience.

Millea applies this attitude not only on a patient-by-patient level but also through large-scale initiatives to better the experience of all surgical and critical care patients.
For one, Millea is leading efforts to make UConn John Dempsey Hospital an American College of Surgeons–verified trauma center, improving systems to optimize trauma care and become a certified center of excellence for patients in the Farmington Valley.

In addition to overseeing the treatment of each critically ill trauma patient at UConn Health, Millea’s board certifications and experience in general surgery and surgical critical care mean he can provide a wide range of skilled care.

“My experience as a critical care surgeon allows me to treat the highest- risk patients who have complex, coexisting medical issues such as high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and lung disease,” Millea says.

As a general surgeon, Millea focuses primarily on surgeries involving the gastrointestinal tract, including appendix or gallbladder removals and hernia surgeries.
Because of his dedication to maintaining an excellent experience for his patients, the majority of general surgical procedures Millea conducts are outpatient, minimally invasive procedures, often done laparoscopically. Recently, Millea and other general surgeons at UConn Health began offering robotic general surgery operations for such procedures as complex hernia repair.

A Massachusetts native, Millea says UConn Health is the perfect place to put his unique skill set to use.

“I joined UConn Health to be part of an academic medical institution with a strong focus on patient care. A cutting-edge academic medical center affords each of my patients access to the most modern approaches and treatments for their surgical diseases.”

Sharing Knowledge for Better Patient Care

Q&A with Dr. Leo J. Wolansky, professor and chair of UConn Radiology

Q

You’ve spearheaded a teaching tool on the UConn Health Radiology website that features cases with images, diagnoses, and even a quiz mode. Where did this idea come from, and how do you envision physicians using it?

Technology has changed the way we get information, and we find that most people answer questions by looking online. Radiology, which relies so heavily on technology, is a specialty that is much more visual than most other fields of medicine. Every day we encounter an abundance of complex digital images created by sophisticated equipment. The digital images can be captured, uploaded, and sent throughout the world with relatively little effort. I thought it would be a waste not to share this valuable material with everyone.

Medical students and radiology residents will likely use it the most. Furthermore, resident doctors in many different fields are tested on the imaging that relates to their specialty. Even after their training, patients expect doctors and other providers to be knowledgeable about everything related to their care, including imaging. Radiology Online can further educate providers and even educate patients about their health. It also provides the contributing physicians and students from UConn as well as other institutions with an academic outlet that is beneficial for career development. It’s UConn’s own open-access radiology review book.


Q

What other projects are you focused on?

We have a number of other initiatives, such as the Linda Clemens Foundation Free Mammogram Program, which provides funds for screening and diagnostic mammograms, breast ultrasounds, and breast biopsies for uninsured and underinsured UConn Health patients. We have added a new CT scanner in the Musculoskeletal Institute building that will increase our capacity significantly and will create a more patient-friendly outpatient setting. We will also offer weekend MRI appointments at the Musculoskeletal Institute. Additionally, we have a new attending, Dr. Abner Gershon, who strengthens our stroke service and is opening a minimally invasive neck and back pain clinic. In the area of nuclear medicine, we are now offering DaTscan brain scans for differentiation of Parkinsonian syndromes from essential tremor.


Q

What can you tell us about the new imaging center in Storrs? How will it benefit patients in the area?

When I started here, I immediately saw how important to the state the UConn athletics program is. It seemed strange that it was so difficult for us to image our own athletes, or any UConn students, in Storrs. From my previous research, I was aware of the Brain Imaging Research Center (BIRC) in Storrs, which has a fabulous scanner. It occurred to me that their MRI scanner could provide patient care without interfering with the research mission of the BIRC.

Once we converted it, we’d be able to read the images here at UConn Health. This would allow us to care for our own student-athletes, other students, faculty, staff, as well as the general public in the Storrs area, sparing them the 45-minute trip to Farmington. I explored a partnership with the BIRC leadership, working closely with Inge-Marie Eigsti, Jay Rueckl, and now the new director, Fumiko Hoeft, who has been extremely helpful. While the scanner will continue to be primarily an instrument of research, soon we will be rolling out this clinical service at the BIRC.

Tracking Opioid Overdoses in Real Time to Save Lives

psychedelic image od opioid


A pilot program led by the Connecticut Poison Control Center and UConn Health’s Emergency Medicine department has been tracking opioid overdoses in Hartford in real time to improve surveillance of the opioid epidemic. More than 1,000 people died from opioid overdoses in Connecticut in 2017, including 80 in Hartford.

The project, launched May 1, has emergency medical service (EMS) personnel in Hartford report overdose cases to the state’s Poison Control Center, part of UConn’s Emergency Medicine department, immediately after the incident. The Center’s poison information specialists ask the emergency responders a series of brief questions and record the data.

The test program is a collaboration with American Medical Response (AMR) ambulances, which provide coverage to two-thirds of Hartford’s communities, and nearby Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center’s emergency department.

“This new program is increasing our awareness of what is happening on the ground,” says Peter Canning, UConn John Dempsey Hospital’s EMS coordinator.

UConn Health hopes the program establishes an effective early warning system to alert public health and safety officials and community stakeholders of any sudden spike in overdoses or the potential threat of a potent batch of opioid drugs released in certain neighborhoods.

Since the program began in May, the AMR ambulance crews in Hartford reported 211 overdose cases to the Connecticut Poison Control Center. In 147 of the reported cases, emergency crews had to administer the opioid antidote naloxone to revive the overdose victims.

Early data attributes 98 percent of the overdoses where the substance was known to heroin and fentanyl, and 2 percent to other opioids such as oxycodone and methadone. The majority of victims — 77 percent — were male, 51 percent of whom were between the ages of 35 and 49. In addition, 67 percent of the overdoses occurred in public areas such as city parks, roadways, sidewalks, and restrooms. EMS also reported cases of victims who thought they bought cocaine, but instead overdosed on powdered heroin.

This fall the pilot program may expand to include Aetna Ambulance Service in the south end of Hartford.​

“This new program is an important step forward and a great example of multi-agency collaboration,” says Dr. Suzanne Doyon, Connecticut Poison Control Center medical director. “Rapid real-time identification of potentially troubled areas of the state is important to public health. Using the connectivity and round-the-clock expertise of the Poison Control Center is both novel and forward-thinking.

“We hope this becomes the model for reporting statewide. The ultimate goal here is to reduce overdoses and save lives.”

Connecticut Student Researchers Shine

CT researcher

Affrin Ahmed of Bloomfield, a UConn second-year international graduate student majoring in applied genomics, is seen working on her Partnership for Innovation and Education (PIE) summer research project.

Ahmed was among the local college students who presented their innovative projects to distinguished guests including state legislators at UConn Health Aug. 1 during Innovation Fellows Research Day, an event that showcased PIE, a newly launched statewide consortium.

The inaugural class of PIE summer program fellows comprises 79 students from UConn, Trinity College, University of St. Joseph, Central Connecticut State University, Southern Connecticut State University, University of Hartford, and Tunxis Community College.


Advanced Aneurysm Stent Means Safer Treatment

Magnetic resonance image shows a cerebral artery aneurysm.

Magnetic resonance image shows a cerebral artery aneurysm.


A new minimally invasive procedure has emerged as a safe way to treat certain brain aneurysms, and UConn Health’s Division of Neurosurgery is among its earliest adopters. The advancement, based on a stent that’s been in use for a decade, is known as the Neuroform Atlas.

“It’s a microstent,” says Dr. Ketan Bulsara, chief of UConn Health’s Division of Neurosurgery. “Sometimes the anatomy may prevent the navigation of a larger stent into the appropriate target area. The advantage of the microstent is, given its small size and smaller equipment requirements, we may be able to get into areas that we couldn’t normally navigate.”

That ability further broadens the range of lesion types that can be treated through minimally invasive means. Most patients who undergo this procedure can go home the following day.

An aneurysm occurs when part of an artery’s wall weakens, causing the artery to bulge. Aneurysms are usually asymptomatic but in some cases can rupture and cause life-threatening internal bleeding. When this occurs in blood vessels leading to the brain, it causes a hemorrhagic stroke, which requires emergency care.

Once an aneurysm is detected, it is important to get an assessment for its risk of rupture as soon as possible. Bulsara says about a third of patients who suffer a ruptured brain aneurysm die, and another third who make it to the hospital don’t fully recover.

“We’re in a time right now where the technological advancements in devices and microsurgical techniques are being made so rapidly that it’s imperative, to maintain the best possible outcome for all of our patients, that we offer the latest, newest technologies that have been deemed safe,” Bulsara says. “Our use of this stent is another testament to that. It continues to add to our treatment armamentarium and increases the number of diseases we can treat safely.”

The first Neuroform Atlas stent placement at UConn Health was among the 20 cases neurosurgeons completed in UConn Health’s new hybrid operating room within the first month of its opening.

Got Breast Milk?

Lactation consultant Marisa Merlo helps maternity patient Bekkilyn Toone breastfeed her newborn son in UConn Health's labor and delivery unit.

Lactation consultant Marisa Merlo helps maternity patient breastfeed her newborn son in UConn Health’s labor and delivery unit.


UConn John Dempsey Hospital is the first hospital in Connecticut, and only location in the Greater Hartford area, to serve as a milk depot for breast milk donations for newborns in need.

“Our new milk depot is going to benefit our tiniest patients in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) across Connecticut and the Northeast, including our very own, the Connecticut Children’s Medical Center NICU here at UConn Health,” says Marisa Merlo, lactation consultant for UConn Health’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

UConn Health’s milk depot, which opened in August, is the fifth in Connecticut to join Mothers’ Milk Bank Northeast. The nonprofit community milk bank, accredited by the Human Milk Banking Association of North America, distributes donated, pasteurized human milk to babies in fragile health throughout the Northeast.

Women interested in donating their breast milk can contact Mothers’ Milk Bank Northeast (milkbankne.org) directly to apply for eligibility and screening. Once women become eligible to donate, their breast milk donations are accepted by Merlo at UConn Health and safeguarded in the freezer of its new milk depot room. Merlo and her staff safely ship the frozen milk to Mothers’ Milk Bank Northeast for pasteurization and distribution to their network of NICUs.

Not all mothers of newborns can produce a sufficient milk supply. Mothers with premature newborns especially can experience difficulty producing or pumping enough breast milk while their baby is in the NICU. Donor milk is a more beneficial substitute for fragile newborns than formula.

“This new milk depot at UConn Health will make it more accessible, easier, and stress-free for women to donate their breast milk to help other women and their babies,” says Natalee Martin, associate director of development for UConn Health. She chose to donate her breast milk for three months after her daughter turned one to help boost the health of NICU babies.

“I know just how critically important donated breast milk is,” says Martin, who used to work for the March of Dimes. “The fact that the donated milk is staying in the Northeast and Connecticut to help other moms is amazing.”

The new milk depot at UConn Health was founded and made possible with initial donations by Merlo, Martin, obstetrician/gynecologist Dr. Christopher Morosky, and Carrie Ferrindino, nurse manager of Maternal Child Health, for the purchase of a milk freezer.

“The milk depot at UConn John Dempsey Hospital is a wonderful opportunity to provide to our community,” says Ferrindino. “Our goal at UConn Health is to do everything in our power to promote and support healthy moms and healthy babies.”

UConn Health First Hospital in U.S. with Augmented Reality Surgical Microscope

Dr. Ketan Bulsara and Dr. Daniel Roberts use the new augmented reality microscope

Dr. Ketan Bulsara and Dr. Daniel Roberts use the new augmented reality microscope in the hybrid OR at UConn John Dempsey Hospital.


UConn Health is the first hospital in the nation to acquire a high-tech surgical microscope with augmented reality capabilities to visually assist surgeons during complex neurological and spinal surgeries. This technology — the latest added to UConn Health’s state-of-the-art hybrid operating room — provides surgeons with an enhanced 3D visualization of the surgical field at the highest magnification possible. It can also illuminate the blood flow through various brain tissues, making more precise surgical interventions possible.

“The advanced augmented reality, image-guided microscope allows us to go beyond what we can normally see with our naked eye and traditional microscopes. It allows practitioners from multiple surgical specialties to treat even more complex lesions more safely,” says Dr. Ketan Bulsara, chief of the Division of Neurosurgery at UConn Health.

The microscope’s unique FusionOptics technology allows a surgeon to see greater anatomical detail with increased sharpness, such as the tiny distances between the smallest blood vessels and nerve structures, without needing to refocus the microscope. It also has the ability to brightly light up tiny blood vessels in the brain to distinguish them from other surrounding brain tissue, helping surgeons navigate the complex and delicate surgical field.

The microscope also includes a video camera that allows surgeons to choose one of three enhanced overlays to amplify the view of the surgical field. The three views are a real-time, highly magnified naked anatomy; a black-and-white, fluorescence-enhanced view to see greater tissue dimensions and blood flow; and a brightly colored, fluorescence-enhanced view of naturally colored anatomy to see the intricate blood flow and tissue outlines during a microsurgical procedure.

The ARveo Augmented Reality microscope is made by Leica Microsystems, a developer and manufacturer of microscopes and scientific instruments for the analysis of microstructures and nanostructures.