Clinical Innovations

Neuroimaging Technique Raises Stroke Treatment Standard

Dr. Leo Wolansky

Dr. Leo Wolansky, chair of the UConn Health Department of Radiology, shows the types of images CT perfusion scanning yields to help determine the best course of action in stroke treatment.


UConn John Dempsey Hospital is among only a few hospitals in the state to offer a new neuroimaging technique to patients who’ve suffered the most common type of stroke, potentially quadrupling the narrow window for intervention to 24 hours from the onset of symptoms.

The cutting-edge technique, which involves new software called RAPID, facilitates computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in emergency settings by making radiologic interpretation of perfusion data simpler, a particularly crucial feature when treating emergency stroke patients.

This helps physicians determine which patients are good candidates for a highly specialized neurosurgical and interventional radiological procedure called mechanical thrombectomy. The lifesaving procedure is only available at a few hospitals in the state; UConn Health Chief of Neurosurgery Dr. Ketan Bulsara performed UConn John Dempsey Hospital’s first-ever mechanical thrombectomy in November.

“It enables us to easily check how large an area of the brain is deprived of blood flow,” says Dr. Leo Wolansky, chair of the UConn Health Department of Radiology. “We can distinguish between the part of the brain that’s already dead [cerebral infarction] and the part of the brain that is in danger of dying [ischemic] but can be saved.”

In October, UConn Health rolled out the perfusion imaging program a week after processing its first functional MRI case for surgical guidance. The innovations are part of a system-wide initiative by UConn Health leadership to provide cutting-edge technology and recruit top physicians familiar with its use, such as Wolansky, in order to provide the finest care for neurological conditions.

Historically, when a patient has cerebral infarction, the most common type of stroke, the race is on to administer a clot-dissolving medication known as a tissue plasminogen activator (TPA). Mechanical thrombectomy traditionally has also been an option with a very limited timespan. With the introduction of advanced imaging such as RAPID, patients now can be treated safely for up to 24 hours of their stroke if the CT perfusion scan is favorable.

“We can tell if there is brain that can be saved, even beyond the previously accepted window of time for thrombectomy,” Wolansky says. “This creates the possibility of treating many ‘wake-up’ strokes, people who went to sleep well, but woke up eight hours later with a stroke.”

The results of a major study known as the DAWN trial, released in May 2017, showed good outcomes for stroke patients who were treated with thrombectomy up to 24 hours after the event.

Cooling Off Chemotherapy’s Side Effects

UConn Health’s Carole and Ray Neag Comprehensive Cancer Center is the only Connecticut institution outside Fairfield County to offer its breast cancer patients optional scalp-cooling therapy to reduce their chances of hair loss from chemotherapy treatments.

“Chemotherapy-induced temporary hair loss is one of the most common and stressful side effects breast cancer patients experience,” says Dr. Susan Tannenbaum, chief of the Division of Oncology and Hematology at UConn Health. “Anything we can do to limit a woman’s distress while she undergoes breast cancer care is essential for the patient’s overall holistic health.”

Research studies have shown that the FDA-cleared DigniCap, made by Dignitana Inc., is nearly 70 percent effective in reducing hair loss by at least half in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

While a patient undergoes intravenous chemotherapy treatments, the computerized cooling cap system circulates cooled liquid through a tight-fitting silicone cap. The cooling therapy works to limit chemotherapy’s side effects by constricting the scalp’s blood vessels, which limits the drug’s reach to the hair follicles and also slows the rate of hair cell division.

The technology’s arrival was spearheaded by donations from UConn Health professors Dr. William B. White and Nancy M. Petry, Ph.D., of the Pat & Jim Calhoun Cardiology Center, among others, and grant funding awarded to the UConn Foundation by the CT Breast Health Initiative.

Veteran’s Hearing Restored


UConn Health is using advanced cochlear implant technology to restore hearing in patients living with severe hearing loss. U.S. Navy veteran Peter Jacobs, 78, of Harwinton, Connecticut, is one of those grateful patients.

At age 18, Jacobs joined the navy and worked as a naval ship gunner. But the long-term repercussions of loud noise exposure during his military service included severe hearing loss, which surfaced in recent years.

“Anything that involved hearing, I was left out of. I couldn’t even hear at funerals,” said Jacobs. “But when I lost the ability to hear sirens and couldn’t talk on the phone, then I had to do something.”

Jacobs consulted UConn Health’s advanced ear, nose, and throat team of Dr. Daniel S. Roberts and audiologist Hillary Siddons, Au.D., about his candidacy for a cochlear implant, an electrical device that bypasses the native hearing mechanism to allow a patient to hear.

“Our recommendations for each patient are based on the degree of their hearing loss and how well a patient can understand words,” says Siddons. “If someone can understand less than 60 percent of conversations, they are likely a candidate for a cochlear implant.”

“When they first turned my cochlear implant on, it was amazing,” says Jacobs. “The best sound, other than my wife, is when I open a window and I can hear the birds. That’s wonderful.”

Following his positive patient experience, Jacobs now recommends cochlear implant technology to his fellow veterans and others who may be struggling with hearing loss.

“My message is do it, because it’s going to change your life,” says Jacobs.

“Cochlear implantation is a spectacular technology,” says Roberts. “It takes a patient from not being able to hear at all to being able to talk on the telephone. Some of the most dramatic outcomes that I have seen, and the happiest patients, are those after a cochlear implant.”

Roberts and his team care for patients experiencing hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and dizziness. Additionally, his surgery practice encompasses cochlear implantation and skull base surgery for acoustic neuromas and malignant or benign tumors.

New Epilepsy Monitoring Technology Tailors Patient Care

by Lauren Woods

Research At The Birkbeck Babylab Into Brain And Cognitive Development LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 03: Research assistant Katarina Begus, prepares a 'Geodesic Sensor Net' for an electroencephalogram (EEG) experiment at the 'Birkbeck Babylab' Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, on March 3, 2014 in London, England. Researchers at the Babylab, which is part of Birkbeck, University of London, study brain and cognitive development in infants from birth through childhood. The scientists use various experiments, often based on simple games, and test the babies' physical or cognitive responses with sensors including: eye-tracking, brain activation and motion capture. (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

The new epilepsy unit will feature a high-density geodesic EEG with more than 250 sensors in a cap like the one pictured. Oli Scarff/Getty Images


UConn Health is now home to a high-tech Epilepsy Monitoring Unit.

Located on the first floor of the new tower at UConn John Dempsey Hospital, the unit has two large patient rooms with state-of-the-art technology; 24-hour video observation capabilities; the latest in advanced electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring; and a dedicated team of neurology and neurosurgery doctors, nurses, and staff.

If needed, patients can be monitored for up to several days so doctors can determine whether the seizures are caused by epilepsy, what kind of seizures they are, and where they originate, says Dr. L. John Greenfield, chair of the Department of Neurology at UConn Health and a nationally-recognized epilepsy specialist. The monitoring information is critical to figuring out the best way to halt the seizures.

For patients with epileptic seizures, the information gathered helps doctors create a personalized clinical care plan and choose the most appropriate medications or adjustments for the patient’s seizure type.

For patients who may need surgical intervention to control their seizures, the new unit will allow doctors to precisely localize where the seizures start in the brain to see if neurosurgery might be a beneficial treatment option. According to Greenfield, if the seizure starts in the temporal lobe, there is a 70 to 80 percent chance the seizures can be cured with brain surgery.

Greenfield hopes the data and insights gained from the new unit’s video and EEG monitoring will advance future brain research and clinical care for epilepsy patients. The new unit will soon offer high-density geodesic EEG recordings that can sample patient brain wave data using more than 250 electrode sensors contained in a wearable, stretchy web that fits over the head like a swim cap. This device can pinpoint epileptic activity with much higher precision than traditional EEGs, which record signals using only 19 electrodes.

“With the combination of our state-of-the-art monitoring unit, clinical care, research, and our new chief of neurosurgery, Dr. Ketan Bulsara, UConn Health can now provide comprehensive care for patients with epilepsy and with seizures due to brain tumors or vascular malformations,” saya Greenfield. Bulsara specializes in skull base, endovascular, and tumor neurosurgery.

Pinpointing Risk Factors to Prevent Postoperative Delirium

by Lauren Woods


With rising surgery demands among the growing population of older adults, the UConn Center on Aging and UConn John Dempsey Hospital are teaming up to identify older patients at the greatest risk of developing postoperative delirium in order to prevent it.

Patients with delirium have an altered level of alertness and are sometimes excessively drowsy, hyper-alert, or agitated. Although postoperative delirium is usually short-term, lasting hours or days, the brain may not recover for weeks or months in older adults. If the condition is not identified and addressed, delirium can lead to a decline in an older patient’s surgical recovery and cognitive and physical health, a need for caregiver or nursing home care, or potentially an increased risk of death.

“Our goal is to do everything in our power to screen older patients before surgery for delirium’s risk factors and to prevent it after surgery — or at least minimize its duration and effect,” says UConn Center on Aging’s Dr. Patrick Coll, who has been working closely with surgeons and anesthesiologists to modify preoperative delirium screening protocols at UConn Health. “All doctors really should be adding delirium-risk-factor screening to their preoperative evaluations for patients age 75 and above.”

Risk factors for postoperative delirium in older patients include prior delirium after a surgery, underlying or existing cognitive impairment such as dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, heavy alcohol consumption that increases withdrawal risk, depression, frailty, malnutrition, immobility, infection, or taking certain medications.

Historically, surgery risk-prevention primarily focused on such areas as cardiac or pulmonary health. Last year, the American College of Surgeons and the American Geriatric Society issued new guidelines for optimal geriatric surgery patient management, which for the first time included screening for delirium risk before and after surgery.

“If a patient is deemed high-risk, the patient should have a geriatric assessment prior to surgery to help mitigate their risk and, after surgery, the hospital care team should plan to very closely monitor the patient,” said Coll.

The hospital care team can take simple, proactive steps to quickly reorient an older patient after surgery, Coll says. Even having a patient’s reading glasses and hearing aids readily available can make a big difference, as well as avoiding or limiting medications that can contribute to delirium, such as opioids.

With the help of aging expert Dr. Lavern Wright, UConn Health’s NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders) program is expanding its scope to the surgical floors of the hospital to reduce older patients’ risk of delirium and other health complications. Further, all nurses now have access to the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) tool and an electronic medical record order set to guide them in decreasing delirium’s impact.

In addition, Dr. Richard Fortinsky and his team are studying the effect of visiting clinical care teams at the homes of older adults with a history of delirium and other cognitive vulnerabilities to improve patient outcomes. This study, funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, involves an in-home care program featuring a nurse practitioner who assesses older adults for delirium using a brief version of the CAM. The nurse practitioner also assesses for depression and dementia and teaches the patient and family members how to manage these conditions at home.

Dr. Alessi and the Concussion (R)evolution

by Peter Nelson

an artsy illustration of a brain overlooking a landscape brain


“You wanna fight? You damn stupid fool,” says Jackie Gleason’s character, trainer Maish Rennick, to Louis “Mountain” Rivera (played by Anthony Quinn) in the 1962 film “Requiem for a Heavyweight.”

“Don’t you understand? The odds are, all you’ll wind up is a mumbling idiot — a stuttering jerk. Why don’t you go home?”

Dr. Anthony Alessi, UConn Health associate clinical professor of neurology and orthopedics and director of the UConn NeuroSport Program, has been giving fighters similar messages, albeit more tactfully phrased, for the last 21 years as the consulting neurologist during boxing matches at Mohegan Sun. He has gone on to study head trauma in other sports, how to measure recovery, how to gauge when an athlete is ready to return to play, and how to prevent head injuries. But he got his start as a “fight doctor.”

After working as an athletic trainer at Mount St. Michael Academy in the Bronx, Alessi eventually opened a neurology practice in Norwich, Connecticut. He started working with the Yankees’ Double-A team, and noticed during his hospital shifts that he was looking at many baseline, prefight brainwave EEGs for boxers on the cards at Mohegan Sun casino.

“The Connecticut boxing commissioner invited me to come down to watch a fight,” Alessi says. “After the fight, he said, ‘How would you like to work with us?’ I said, ‘Do I get to end the fight?’”
“He said, ‘We want you to.’ I’ve been ending fights since 1996.”

There’s no such thing as a minor concussion. And as I tell students, if you’ve seen one concussion, you’ve seen one concussion. They’re all different.

Alessi admits it’s odd for a neurologist to work in a sport where the entire goal is to induce maximum cognitive impairment in your opponent — but that’s exactly what makes his presence imperative.

“In mixed martial arts, you have the ability to tap out,” Alessi says. “In boxing, they can’t quit. But you’d be surprised how many times you go into the corner and the fighter doesn’t want to come back out. That’s the first question I ask them, and if they say no, I end the fight. He’ll still get paid, and I’ve saved his life.”

The American Academy of Neurology has backed off from its edict in the 1980s that boxing should be banned, instead calling for measures including more regulations and formal neurologic examinations for fighters. Alessi says more and more neurologists have gotten involved in the sport, screening individuals to determine whether they should fight.

Besides protecting individual athletes, Alessi has used boxing as a lens through which to view the larger picture surrounding head trauma.

“As the public awareness about long-term brain damage from concussions developed, I realized it was like I had my own lab,” he says.

More to Learn

The world has known for a long time about the dangers of head trauma, the syndrome codified in 1928 when New Jersey forensic pathologist Dr. Harrison Stanford Martland published a paper in The Journal of the American Medical Association on fighters and coined the term “punch drunk.”

Today, it seems that new findings on head injury are in the news daily. Since 2001, more than 60,000 scientific papers on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and brain trauma have been published, raising awareness at both the public and professional levels, leading to protocols where athletes are pulled from games at the first sign of concussion. Trainers are taught to perform a SCAT5 (Sport Concussion Assessment Tool, 5th edition), elaborating on the questions the old cigar-chomping cornermen used to ask fighters between rounds: “What’s your name? What day is it? Do you know where you are?”

The SCAT5 is used because the greatest and most immediate danger to concussion sufferers is second-impact syndrome, a fatal edema caused by a second head trauma sustained before the brain has had time to repair torn tissues, ruptured blood vessels, or damage at the cellular level from an earlier injury. Other organs have room to expand if they swell. The brain, encased in a hard shell, does not.

“There’s no such thing as a minor concussion,” says Alessi, who teaches at the UConn School of Medicine. “And as I tell students, if you’ve seen one concussion, you’ve seen one concussion. They’re all different. In most cases, a single concussion should not cause permanent damage, but a second concussion, soon after the first, does not have to be very strong for its effects to be permanently disabling or deadly.”


Throughout his career, neurologist Dr. Anthony Alessi has served as a consultant for professional boxers and football and baseball players, as well as UConn student-athletes.

Throughout his career, neurologist Dr. Anthony Alessi has served as a consultant for professional boxers and football and baseball players, as well as UConn student-athletes. Over the decades, he has witnessed a sea change in the way people talk about, prevent, and treat head injuries in contact sports. Peter Morenus


The problem with studying concussions is that you can’t line up a variety of test subjects of various ages and sizes, take baseline measurements, and then hit them in the head with a 13-pound bowling ball moving 20 mph — the equivalent, experts estimate, to taking a punch from a pro boxer. You can’t then compare those results to the results from hitting them with 6-pound bowling balls moving 40 mph, or to what the results would be if you hit them once an hour, or once a day for a month, or in the side of the head instead of the front.

“Ninety percent of the time, after a concussion, you wait 10 days and the athlete is going to be okay. But we still don’t know what the long-term effects might be. We know how the cells repair themselves, but we don’t know what kind of debris might be left behind once the cells heal,” Alessi says.

Playing Smarter

In July, Boston University released the results of a study of the brains of 202 deceased football players, 111 of whom had played in the NFL. All but one of the NFL players’ brains were found to have CTE.

Alessi is, of course, aware of the current discussion of CTE in relation to professional sports, but he attends from a scientist’s detached distance.

“There’s an association with football, but it doesn’t mean there’s causation. It’s an important difference. There’s a lot of selection bias.”

Those who donate their brains, Alessi says, may be looking for a biological explanation for their depression, for example.

Alessi is more concerned that attention is being paid in the wrong places.

“It’s a pyramid,” he says. “There are only 1,800 professional football players. In college football, there are 54,000. In high school football, about a million. In youth football, you have over 3 million children. Another 3 million children play youth soccer, and a half million play youth hockey. So you have 6.5 million young athletes playing high-velocity collision sports, all with brains that are still developing.”

Children lack both the myelin sheathing that protects older brains and the developed neck musculature that helps older athletes avoid injury. In addition to working with UConn student-athletes and teams, Alessi advises youth sports programs and is concerned for the younger athletes.

“They’re smaller and they don’t move as fast, so the force of impact is less, but they’re more vulnerable,” Alessi says. “We used to think if you let kids play full-contact sports, it will toughen them up — not true. The more contact you have, the greater the risk.

“There’s also inadequate medical attention at those levels,” he says. “We’re not paying attention to where our resources should be placed the most.”

The Korey Stringer Institute (KSI), a national sports safety research and advocacy organization based at UConn, recently urged state high school athletic associations to implement life-saving measures after KSI conducted the first comprehensive state-by-state assessment of high school sports safety polices. Each state received a score based on the extent to which it met best- practice guidelines addressing the four leading causes of sudden death among secondary school athletes, which include head injuries.

Requiring the presence of certified athletic trainers at every secondary school athletic event and training coaches on concussion symptoms are among the bare-minimum guidelines, which are endorsed by leading sports medicine organizations in the United States.

Still, progress has been made.

Banning checking and headers in youth hockey and soccer and reducing full-contact practices to once a week for professional and college football have been linked to reduced injuries, Alessi says. But many youth football teams still have full-contact practice five days a week.

No one wants collision sports to go away, Alessi says, but instead of striving to play harder, he believes we can strive to play smarter.

“You have to ask, what’s to be gained from high-velocity impact at a young age? The fastest-growing youth sport in America today is flag football. Archie Manning [former pro-football quarterback and father of Peyton and Eli Manning] didn’t let his sons play youth football. Tom Brady never played youth football. A lot of really good professional athletes in the NFL knew that they could build skill without getting hit,” Alessi says.

“I think there’s a lot to be gained by us changing the rules. We’ve made a lot of headway with all neurologic injuries in sports. Legislation isn’t required to deploy common sense.”

Thanks to the work of Alessi and people like him, athletes know the risks before they step on the field or in the ring. While there’s always more research to be done, at the very least, we’ve replaced the comical cartoon image of the cross-eyed concussion victim — with the lump rising from his noggin and stars and birds circling his head — with reliable information. The kind of information an athlete in a collision sport needs to make informed decisions and to play safely, avoiding injuries when possible and returning to play only when it’s safe to do so.

“If you gotta say anything to him,” Maish Rennick says of “Mountain” Rivera at the end of the movie, “tell him you pity him. Tell him you feel so sorry for him you could cry. But don’t con him.”

The Healing Power of Fat

digital rendering of inside throat


Fat cells are increasingly being used in cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery, and now UConn Health has restored one patient’s lost voice by leveraging the power of fat.

In 2013, Ed Favolise, 70, a retired superintendent of schools in Connecticut, had surgery to remove a precancerous tumor from his chest. Part of the tumor encased a nerve that was severed during surgery, leaving his right vocal cord paralyzed and a major gap between his vocal cords.

For three years, Favolise’s voice was limited to a squeaky, high-pitched whisper while he pursued remedies at three different medical centers. After five surgeries and continuous vocal therapy, Favolise turned to the Voice Center at UConn Health.
Dr. Denis Lafreniere, chief of the Division of Otolaryngology, teamed up with Dr. Andrew Chen, chief of the Division of Plastic Surgery, to offer an innovative solution.

In the operating room, Lafreniere and Chen withdrew fat cells from Favolise’s abdomen, processed and measured them to make sure they had enough pure fat cells, and placed them directly into his injured vocal cord via a needle injector through a laryngoscope. The result? A permanently plumped vocal cord that’s in the proper position to contact the left vocal cord.

“My speech improved immediately and significantly,” says Favolise. “My experience shows that sometimes you need to be willing to take a chance on a pretty surprising, promising alternative medical solution and procedure.”

Diagnosing Disruptions in the Autonomic Nervous System

UConn Health Hospital Building


Since the bodily functions it controls are automatic and involuntary, people don’t think much about their autonomic nervous system (ANS). But ANS dysfunction can indicate serious medical problems, and early detection is key to avoiding complications.

UConn Health is home to the only testing laboratory in the state dedicated to diagnosing disruptions in the body’s ANS.

ANS is the control center that regulates the body’s automatic functions, including stress response, heart rate, blood pressure, digestion, and urinary functions. Interruptions in the system can occur if there is a disruption in communication between the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves.

Abnormal ANS reflexes can be a sign of medical conditions such as cardiovascular problems, diabetic neuropathy, and Parkinson’s or other neurodegenerative diseases.

“A series of simple ANS tests can help a patient finally find potential answers and treatment options for lingering, undiagnosed symptoms,” says UConn Health neurologist Dr. Matthew Imperioli. “The Neurology Department’s ANS Lab at UConn Health is proud to be filling a patient-care gap to meet the needs of patients
across Connecticut.”

Testing at UConn Health’s ANS lab can be performed in less than an hour by Imperioli, who has advanced fellowship training in this growing neurology subspecialty. Since it opened in May 2016, the lab has been busy assessing patients referred by neurology and primary care physicians searching for answers for their patient’s symptoms, such as recurrent fainting or dizziness.

The panel of four tests hunts for any abnormal ANS reflexes. Quantitative sudomotor axon reflex testing (QSART) uses specialized electrode technology on the arm and leg to measure sweat capabilities. Simultaneous heart rate and blood pressure technology captures any variability during deep breaths and forceful exhales.

Also, an automated tilt table with EKG and specialized heartbeat-to-heartbeat blood pressure monitoring repeatedly checks for any changes as a patient rotates from a lying-down position to nearly standing.

“Early detection of an ANS disorder is critical so we can prevent patient falls or injury, avoid health complications, prescribe the correct medications, and improve a patient’s quality of life sooner rather than later,” Imperioli says.

Fitbit Helps Save Patient’s Life

UConn Doctor checks patient's heart


This January, Patricia Lauder of Harwinton, Connecticut, had an illness she just couldn’t shake. Visits to doctors, testing, and X-rays came back negative for pneumonia or any other health issues.

Lauder started experiencing shortness of breath and fatigue after walking short distances. She noticed that her Fitbit fitness tracker — which the 73-year-old purchased after retiring to help her get in shape — was showing her resting heart rate increasing by five points a day.

On the day her resting heart rate spiked to 140 beats per minute, she called an ambulance.

A CT scan at UConn John Dempsey Hospital revealed she was suffering from two large blood clots in her lung arteries, known as pulmonary embolisms.

According to Dr. JuYong Lee, director of vascular and endovascular medicine at UConn Health’s Pat and Jim Calhoun Cardiology Center, the mortality rate of a pulmonary embolism is more than 30 percent when it is massive.

Lee decided to intervene right away with an innovative, minimally invasive solution, applying clot-blusting drugs directly into the clots through a catheter.

The next day, Lauder’s blood clots were gone and her lung and heart health totally normalized.

“If I didn’t have a Fitbit on my wrist, I might not be here to tell my story,” Lauder says.

Connecticut’s Effective Formula for Cystic Fibrosis Screening

small child held in the arms of mother while doctor (in background) consults


While all states require newborns to be screened for cystic fibrosis, Connecticut does it differently than most.

A unique collaboration — in which UConn Health screens the newborns, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center provides timely clinical intervention, and University of Florida Health (UF Health) offers genetic counseling via telemedicine — leads to early diagnosis and treatment, which can add years to patients’ lives.

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a progressive genetic disease. A thick mucus buildup forms in the lungs, making patients prone to infections, lung damage, and respiratory failure. The pancreas doesn’t release enzymes, inhibiting the body’s ability to digest food and absorb nutrients.

If UConn Health screenings within days of birth show a CF gene mutation, a sweat test — considered the most reliable way to diagnose CF — is recommended to determine whether the baby is a carrier or has the disease.

And it’s at this stage when the process becomes unique.

On the same visit as the sweat test, parents have a no-cost, private, video consultation with a UF Health genetic counselor, made possible by a grant from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, to help them understand the implications of
the mutations.

Three other clinical sites in the U.S. partner with UF Health. UConn Health screens 7 of 10 infants born in the state, accounting for more than half the screenings done under the UF Health partnerships.

Though it wasn’t mandated by state law until 2009, UConn Health has screened newborns for CF since 1993. The collaboration with UF started in 2014.

“With the addition of the genetic counseling piece, our program has significantly decreased the time to sweat test and ultimately CF diagnosis,” says Dr. Melanie Sue Collins, associate director of the Central Connecticut Cystic Fibrosis Center at Connecticut Children’s.

The approach is well received by parents, says Sidney Hopfer, UConn professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine.

“We have all the pieces: the tests are easily obtainable; the patients don’t have to travel far; there is coordination between the lab, CF Center, and primary care physician regarding testing and genetic counseling,” Hopfer says. “In my opinion, this is something that should be done nationally.”