Aerobics

Lab Notes — Fall 2019

The Key to Allergies

An unexpected source drives severe allergies, researchers from UConn Health, The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, and Yale University report in Science. An antibody known as high-affinity IgE is often behind the most severe food allergies, triggering anaphylactic shock. The researchers looked at mice with a genetic immune problem that causes severe food allergies including anaphylaxis. They found a subtype of immune cells called Tfh13 signal to B cells, another category of immune cell, telling them to make high-affinity IgE. When the researchers deleted Tfh13 cells in mice, the allergies disappeared. People with severe allergies tend to have elevated Tfh13 levels compared with nonallergic peers. The findings could point the way to better allergy testing and perhaps new approaches for treating allergies.


Just Breathe

Yoga practice that emphasizes mental relaxation and breathing techniques can have as much of a beneficial impact on high blood pressure as aerobic exercise, according to research by Yin Wu, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in UConn’s Department of Kinesiology. The study, published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, highlights the potential for yoga as an alternative antihypertensive therapy, particularly for those unable or unwilling to perform aerobic exercise. “We are not telling people to use yoga to substitute for aerobic exercise,” says Wu. “Aerobic exercise is the gold standard for antihypertensive lifestyle therapy. But yoga provides an additional option that can be just as effective.”


Caution: Falls Ahead

Antidepressant drugs known as selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, or SNRIs, can lead to adverse events in adults over 65, according to a team of researchers from UConn School of Pharmacy, UConn Health, and Yale University. Among this drug class, duloxetine, which is commonly known as Cymbalta, was shown to most likely increase the risk of falls over time, according to the study published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society. SNRIs, particularly duloxetine, should be avoided or used with caution in older adults, the researchers say.


Halting Hypertension’s Effects

Elderly people with hypertension who took a high dosage of medicine to manage their high blood pressure showed significantly less accumulation of harmful brain lesions compared to those taking a lower dose of the same medicine, UConn Health researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology’s 68th Annual Scientific Session. However, the reduction in brain lesions did not translate to a significant improvement in mobility and cognitive function. The INFINITY study is the first to demonstrate an effective way to slow the progression of cerebrovascular disease, a condition common in older adults that restricts the flow of blood to the brain. In addition to seeing beneficial effects in the brain, those who kept their blood pressure lower also were less likely to suffer major cardiovascular events, such as a heart attack or stroke.

Exercise Can Improve Alzheimer’s Symptoms

A new UConn analysis of years of previous research suggests there is ample evidence that exercise may delay the decline in cognitive function associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Aerobic exercise has possibly the most favorable effect, according to the study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Led by Gregory Panza, a UConn kinesiology graduate student, this is the first analysis of a group of studies on a particular type of dementia — Alzheimer’s.

The authors examined data from 19 studies with 23 interventions that encompassed 1,125 participants who were at risk of Alzheimer’s. The studies were all conducted prior to August 2017 and published in peer-reviewed journals.

The studies led to the overall conclusion that moderate-intensity exercise training about three days a week for 45 minutes resulted in modestly better cognitive function for participants. The findings reinforce the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, which recommend exercise as a cost-effective lifestyle therapeutic option to improve brain health in older adults.