Dr. Bruce T. Liang

Leadership in Diversity

High school research apprentices attend a Health Care Opportunity Programs symposium in July.

High school research apprentices attend a Health Care Opportunity Programs symposium in July.


This spring, U.S. News & World Report named UConn School of Medicine among the 10 medical schools nationwide with the most African American students, a validation of the School’s efforts to grow the diversity of its student body.

The School’s African American student population for 2018–2019 was 11.8%, well above the national average for medical schools. The national average, which was 6% in 1980, is now 7.1%.

“The lack of African Americans and other underrepresented minorities choosing to enter the fields of medicine and research is a critical and longstanding national issue,” says Dr. Bruce T. Liang, dean of UConn’s medical school. “We look forward to further helping curb this national issue and building a stronger, more diverse pipeline of future health care professionals through our medical educational mission and training initiatives.”

Research has shown that racial and ethnic diversity in medical education improves the learning and cross-cultural competencies of all doctors. And minority medical students are more likely to work in underserved communities and, therefore, positively influence access to care.

UConn School of Medicine has worked for decades to increase diversity, with much success. With this year’s incoming class, the medical school’s underrepresented-population enrollment is expected to reach a height of nearly 23%. For more than a decade, UConn’s medical school has maintained its overall percentage of African American students and has doubled the number of black males enrolled.

Having among the highest number of African American students “is very gratifying,” says Dr. Marja M. Hurley, founding director and associate dean for the Health Career Opportunity Programs at UConn Health, sponsored by the Aetna Health Professions Partnership Initiative. For nearly two decades, these programs have aimed to attract more young people from across Connecticut, of all ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds, to medicine and science.

Of the nearly 900 youth from the state’s elementary schools, high schools, and colleges who have participated in the programs since 1996, more than 500 have gone on to enter medical, dental, or other health profession schools. Among the School of Medicine Class of 2019, 66% of the African American graduating students participated in one or more of the programs.

“We are very proud of the successes in growing the diversity of our student body, and also building a greater pipeline for a more diverse future health care workforce,” says Hurley.

Liang added: “This is very good recognition for the UConn School of Medicine and the excellent work of our medical school’s Student Affairs team and Dr. Marja Hurley.”

School of Medicine Reaccredited

Through a vote at an October 2018 meeting, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) accredited the University of Connecticut School of Medicine medical education program for another eight-year term.

The School of Medicine was deemed satisfactory in 92 of the 93 elements and compliant with all 12 standards of the accreditation criteria by the LCME, which is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as the authority for the accreditation of medical education programs.

“We are pleased with this positive outcome and would like to thank the various faculty and staff members who were so instrumental in this remarkable achievement,” says Dr. Bruce T. Liang, dean of the School of Medicine, who directed the effort to prepare for the accreditation of the medical education program.

“Since a new curriculum was recently introduced, there are several elements that will continue to be monitored, but we are committed to working diligently toward strengthening the program even further.”

Event Spotlight: Global Genomics Conference

Genomics and Society: expanding the ELSI universe


UConn Health and The Jackson Laboratory Host Global Genomics Conference

Good genomics research requires healthy curiosity, powerful data analysis, rigorous scientific methodology — and a strong ethical grounding. UConn Health and the Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine co-hosted the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Research Program’s (ELSI) fourth-annual conference June 5 through 7 to explore how ethical decisions surrounding genomic discoveries are informed by the legal and social context of our society.

Nearly 300 people attended the three-day “Genomics and Society: Expanding the ELSI Universe” conference, which brought experts from around the world to UConn Health in Farmington, Connecticut, to discuss both what we can do with our genomic knowledge and the responsibilities that come with that power.

“The increase in genomic testing and technology are fueling breakthrough discoveries here in Connecticut and around the globe for heart disease, cancer, and a host of rare diseases,” said Dr. Bruce T. Liang, dean of UConn School of Medicine. “However, these promising personalized medicine therapies and our greater genetic knowledge may also come with a steep societal price if we don’t address the associated concerns in a timely fashion.”

Keynote speakers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and universities across the country spoke about the ethics of genomics in the clinical setting; the relationship between genes, ancestry, and identity; and the NIH’s All of Us initiative. All of Us seeks to broaden the genetic database used for research in the United States so that it more accurately reflects the citizenry and the differences in lifestyle, environment, and biology encountered in different populations across the country.

Much of the funding for ELSI comes from the National Human Genome Research Institute, with the goal of supporting research that anticipates and addresses the societal impact of genomic science. The institute has four broad priorities: genomic research; tracking how that research influences health care; exploring how social norms and beliefs affect how we understand genetic advances and how we use them; and legal, regulatory, and public policy issues. Workshops at the conference covered specific topics from those areas, including the implications of genetic testing in the criminal justice system; the uses and misuses of the gene editing technique known as CRISPR; and the controversies over the appropriate use of genetics in psychiatric, neurologic, and behavioral fields.

More information about the ELSI project.