Dr. L. John Greenfield

New Epilepsy Monitoring Technology Tailors Patient Care

by Lauren Woods

Research At The Birkbeck Babylab Into Brain And Cognitive Development LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 03: Research assistant Katarina Begus, prepares a 'Geodesic Sensor Net' for an electroencephalogram (EEG) experiment at the 'Birkbeck Babylab' Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, on March 3, 2014 in London, England. Researchers at the Babylab, which is part of Birkbeck, University of London, study brain and cognitive development in infants from birth through childhood. The scientists use various experiments, often based on simple games, and test the babies' physical or cognitive responses with sensors including: eye-tracking, brain activation and motion capture. (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

The new epilepsy unit will feature a high-density geodesic EEG with more than 250 sensors in a cap like the one pictured. Oli Scarff/Getty Images


UConn Health is now home to a high-tech Epilepsy Monitoring Unit.

Located on the first floor of the new tower at UConn John Dempsey Hospital, the unit has two large patient rooms with state-of-the-art technology; 24-hour video observation capabilities; the latest in advanced electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring; and a dedicated team of neurology and neurosurgery doctors, nurses, and staff.

If needed, patients can be monitored for up to several days so doctors can determine whether the seizures are caused by epilepsy, what kind of seizures they are, and where they originate, says Dr. L. John Greenfield, chair of the Department of Neurology at UConn Health and a nationally-recognized epilepsy specialist. The monitoring information is critical to figuring out the best way to halt the seizures.

For patients with epileptic seizures, the information gathered helps doctors create a personalized clinical care plan and choose the most appropriate medications or adjustments for the patient’s seizure type.

For patients who may need surgical intervention to control their seizures, the new unit will allow doctors to precisely localize where the seizures start in the brain to see if neurosurgery might be a beneficial treatment option. According to Greenfield, if the seizure starts in the temporal lobe, there is a 70 to 80 percent chance the seizures can be cured with brain surgery.

Greenfield hopes the data and insights gained from the new unit’s video and EEG monitoring will advance future brain research and clinical care for epilepsy patients. The new unit will soon offer high-density geodesic EEG recordings that can sample patient brain wave data using more than 250 electrode sensors contained in a wearable, stretchy web that fits over the head like a swim cap. This device can pinpoint epileptic activity with much higher precision than traditional EEGs, which record signals using only 19 electrodes.

“With the combination of our state-of-the-art monitoring unit, clinical care, research, and our new chief of neurosurgery, Dr. Ketan Bulsara, UConn Health can now provide comprehensive care for patients with epilepsy and with seizures due to brain tumors or vascular malformations,” saya Greenfield. Bulsara specializes in skull base, endovascular, and tumor neurosurgery.

New Neurology Chair Sees UConn’s Possibilities

UConn Health Exterior, Farmington CT


Dr. L. John Greenfield looks forward to helping push UConn Health’s Department of Neurology to the next level as its new chair.

Greenfield, a nationally known epilepsy expert, came to UConn Health in early September from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine, where he also served as chair of neurology. He will also serve as the academic chair of neurology at Hartford Hospital.

“I see a lot of possibilities at UConn,” Greenfield says.

These include goals of establishing an epilepsy monitoring unit, developing a high-density electroencephalography (EEG) facility, and continuing to expand the stroke, neuromuscular, MS, and movement disorders programs.

Because we’re training the next generation of neurologists, we’re focused on … doing research and developing new treatments.

Greenfield’s arrival as UConn Health’s third epilepsy specialist puts the department at a “critical mass for moving things to the next level,” he says.

Previously, UConn Health has relied on Hartford Hospital for inpatient monitoring of epilepsy patients to determine if they are candidates for epilepsy surgery. Greenfield hopes UConn can establish its own unit for the initial phase of the process. He plans for continued and expanded collaboration with neurologists at Hartford Hospital in epilepsy and other areas. Neurologists at UConn and Hartford Hospital already work closely together in training neurology resident physicians and fellows.

UConn Health is also developing a high-density EEG facility, which would be a resource for the region, he says. Traditional EEGs monitor brainwaves using 15-20 electrodes. A high-density EEG involves a special cap with more than 250 contact points, providing more detailed information on where seizures are coming from, along with other potential uses.

The department also plans to hire more doctors to support its successful movement disorders, neuromuscular, MS, and stroke programs, according to Greenfield, while continuing to provide top-quality care in more “bread and butter” neurological disorders, such as chronic headaches.

“The fact that we’re accessible, very highly trained and patient focused, and an academic medical center gives us an edge against our competitors,” Greenfield says. “Because we’re training the next generation of neurologists, we’re focused on not only using the latest techniques and information so we can teach them, and also doing research and developing new treatments.”