Dr. William B. White

Cooling Off Chemotherapy’s Side Effects

UConn Health’s Carole and Ray Neag Comprehensive Cancer Center is the only Connecticut institution outside Fairfield County to offer its breast cancer patients optional scalp-cooling therapy to reduce their chances of hair loss from chemotherapy treatments.

“Chemotherapy-induced temporary hair loss is one of the most common and stressful side effects breast cancer patients experience,” says Dr. Susan Tannenbaum, chief of the Division of Oncology and Hematology at UConn Health. “Anything we can do to limit a woman’s distress while she undergoes breast cancer care is essential for the patient’s overall holistic health.”

Research studies have shown that the FDA-cleared DigniCap, made by Dignitana Inc., is nearly 70 percent effective in reducing hair loss by at least half in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

While a patient undergoes intravenous chemotherapy treatments, the computerized cooling cap system circulates cooled liquid through a tight-fitting silicone cap. The cooling therapy works to limit chemotherapy’s side effects by constricting the scalp’s blood vessels, which limits the drug’s reach to the hair follicles and also slows the rate of hair cell division.

The technology’s arrival was spearheaded by donations from UConn Health professors Dr. William B. White and Nancy M. Petry, Ph.D., of the Pat & Jim Calhoun Cardiology Center, among others, and grant funding awarded to the UConn Foundation by the CT Breast Health Initiative.

Lab Notes – Summer 2016

Researchers Reveal a Secret of Sepsis

human cell rendering

Severe bacterial infections can push the human body into sepsis, a life-threatening cascade of inflammation and cell death that can be difficult to cure. In the May 19 issue of Cell, immunologist Vijay Rathinam and colleagues at UConn Health proposed an explanation for how bacteria trigger such a dangerous reaction: The human cells aren’t really being invaded. They just think they are, at least when sepsis is caused by gram-negative bacteria. Gram-negative bacteria secrete vesicles of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) that can get inside human cells and set off alarms. When the cell detects the LPS, it thinks a bacterium has slipped past its defenses and self-destructs, spilling inflammatory cytokines that prompt the bacteria to emit more LPS, setting off a vicious cycle.


Nanoparticles: guided missiles for drug delivery

Powerful drugs such as chemotherapy and steroids can be devastatingly effective against their intended targets — but they have a tendency to devastate other, healthy body systems as well. UConn chemist Jessica Rouge is working to make these medications more discriminating in their action by bundling them into guided nanoparticles. Her lab is developing aptamers, molecules that bind to a specific target proteins or cell receptors, that can be attached to the nanoparticles to guide them straight to damaged or diseased cells. This approach could help cancer patients avoid the worst side effects of chemotherapy. It could also be useful for asthmatics who need steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. With this strategy, the drugs could be sent straight to the lungs, side-stepping side effects completely.


Walnuts May Improve Your Colon Health

a walnut in its shell

Eating walnuts may change gut bacteria in a way that suppresses colon cancer. A team of researchers from UConn Health and The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine found that mice that ate 7-10.5 percent of their total calories as walnuts (about an ounce per day for humans) developed fewer colon cancers. Walnuts are packed with compounds known to be important nutritionally, but it may be as a whole food that they pack the most significant anti-cancer punch against colon cancer, the third most common cancer in the world. The research, supported in part by the California Walnut Commission and the American Institute for Cancer Research, was published May 23 in the journal Cancer Prevention Research. UConn Health Center for Molecular Medicine cancer researcher Dan Rosenberg and colleagues are now working on a long-term study in humans.


Congestive Heart Failure plus Type 2 Diabetes Worse Than We Knew

Diabetes blood Sugar monitor and test strip

Data from more than 5,300 patients with Type 2 diabetes has shown that these patients face a one-in-four chance of dying within 18 months of being hospitalized for congestive heart failure, according to the global EXAMINE study, led by UConn Health professor of medicine Dr. William B. White. Patients with Type 2 diabetes have two to three times the heart disease risk of the general population. White hopes the results inspire patients and doctors to focus more on preventing cardiovascular disease. The findings were presented June 11 at the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) annual meeting in New Orleans and published online in the ADA journal Diabetes Care.