Jay Rueckl

Sharing Knowledge for Better Patient Care

Q&A with Dr. Leo J. Wolansky, professor and chair of UConn Radiology

Q

You’ve spearheaded a teaching tool on the UConn Health Radiology website that features cases with images, diagnoses, and even a quiz mode. Where did this idea come from, and how do you envision physicians using it?

Technology has changed the way we get information, and we find that most people answer questions by looking online. Radiology, which relies so heavily on technology, is a specialty that is much more visual than most other fields of medicine. Every day we encounter an abundance of complex digital images created by sophisticated equipment. The digital images can be captured, uploaded, and sent throughout the world with relatively little effort. I thought it would be a waste not to share this valuable material with everyone.

Medical students and radiology residents will likely use it the most. Furthermore, resident doctors in many different fields are tested on the imaging that relates to their specialty. Even after their training, patients expect doctors and other providers to be knowledgeable about everything related to their care, including imaging. Radiology Online can further educate providers and even educate patients about their health. It also provides the contributing physicians and students from UConn as well as other institutions with an academic outlet that is beneficial for career development. It’s UConn’s own open-access radiology review book.


Q

What other projects are you focused on?

We have a number of other initiatives, such as the Linda Clemens Foundation Free Mammogram Program, which provides funds for screening and diagnostic mammograms, breast ultrasounds, and breast biopsies for uninsured and underinsured UConn Health patients. We have added a new CT scanner in the Musculoskeletal Institute building that will increase our capacity significantly and will create a more patient-friendly outpatient setting. We will also offer weekend MRI appointments at the Musculoskeletal Institute. Additionally, we have a new attending, Dr. Abner Gershon, who strengthens our stroke service and is opening a minimally invasive neck and back pain clinic. In the area of nuclear medicine, we are now offering DaTscan brain scans for differentiation of Parkinsonian syndromes from essential tremor.


Q

What can you tell us about the new imaging center in Storrs? How will it benefit patients in the area?

When I started here, I immediately saw how important to the state the UConn athletics program is. It seemed strange that it was so difficult for us to image our own athletes, or any UConn students, in Storrs. From my previous research, I was aware of the Brain Imaging Research Center (BIRC) in Storrs, which has a fabulous scanner. It occurred to me that their MRI scanner could provide patient care without interfering with the research mission of the BIRC.

Once we converted it, we’d be able to read the images here at UConn Health. This would allow us to care for our own student-athletes, other students, faculty, staff, as well as the general public in the Storrs area, sparing them the 45-minute trip to Farmington. I explored a partnership with the BIRC leadership, working closely with Inge-Marie Eigsti, Jay Rueckl, and now the new director, Fumiko Hoeft, who has been extremely helpful. While the scanner will continue to be primarily an instrument of research, soon we will be rolling out this clinical service at the BIRC.