Minimally Invasive Surgery

Trauma Director Puts Patients First

Emergency vehicle heading towards an emergency room


As he marks his first year as Medical Director of Trauma at UConn Health, Dr. Ryan Millea hasn’t lost focus on what drives him, whether responding at a moment’s notice to the surgical needs of a car accident victim or to an intensive care patient with a life-threatening gastrointestinal burst.

“My philosophy is to always deliver patient-centered care,” says Millea, who is also a general and critical care surgeon. “I’m very hands-on to improve a patient’s overall experience. No one likes being sick, so I try to make things as seamless and smooth as possible from preoperative care to recovery.”

I’m very hands-on to improve a patient’s overall experience.

Millea applies this attitude not only on a patient-by-patient level but also through large-scale initiatives to better the experience of all surgical and critical care patients.
For one, Millea is leading efforts to make UConn John Dempsey Hospital an American College of Surgeons–verified trauma center, improving systems to optimize trauma care and become a certified center of excellence for patients in the Farmington Valley.

In addition to overseeing the treatment of each critically ill trauma patient at UConn Health, Millea’s board certifications and experience in general surgery and surgical critical care mean he can provide a wide range of skilled care.

“My experience as a critical care surgeon allows me to treat the highest- risk patients who have complex, coexisting medical issues such as high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and lung disease,” Millea says.

As a general surgeon, Millea focuses primarily on surgeries involving the gastrointestinal tract, including appendix or gallbladder removals and hernia surgeries.
Because of his dedication to maintaining an excellent experience for his patients, the majority of general surgical procedures Millea conducts are outpatient, minimally invasive procedures, often done laparoscopically. Recently, Millea and other general surgeons at UConn Health began offering robotic general surgery operations for such procedures as complex hernia repair.

A Massachusetts native, Millea says UConn Health is the perfect place to put his unique skill set to use.

“I joined UConn Health to be part of an academic medical institution with a strong focus on patient care. A cutting-edge academic medical center affords each of my patients access to the most modern approaches and treatments for their surgical diseases.”

Hybrid OR Expands Surgical Capabilities


This spring, neurosurgery chief Dr. Ketan Bulsara and his team were the first to perform surgery in UConn John Dempsey Hospital’s 1,200-square-foot hybrid operating room.

The team leveraged the new high-tech room and its dual advanced X-ray imaging capabilities to guide a successful minimally invasive neurological procedure.

“There are not many biplane hybrid operating rooms in the United States, and there are only a handful along the East Coast,” says Bulsara. “The biplane imaging provides surgeons multiple views and not only makes patient care safer but also allows surgeons to do things that we could not ordinarily do inside the operating room.”

The hybrid room gives surgeons the ability to perform a range of procedures in one setting, from minimally invasive treatments to the most complex neurosurgery, interventional cardiology, and vascular procedures.

“The hybrid operating room allows surgeons to choose what they feel is the best treatment for that patient,” says Bulsara.

According to Bulsara, the hybrid room enables UConn Health to continue providing world-class care to its patients while shaping the future of surgery and medicine and optimizing the personalized care given to each individual patient.

The hybrid operating room is a new tool for us that allows us to deliver health care in ways we have never been able to before.

UConn Health’s Dr. Stephen Lahey, chief of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, says he couldn’t agree more.

“The hybrid operating room enables us to deliver health care in ways we have never been able to before,” says Lahey. “We now have all the advanced radiological equipment inside a huge operating room.”

All the high-tech equipment in the hybrid OR hangs from the ceiling, including imaging equipment, large plasma screens, and LED boom lights that assist surgeons with brighter and sharper lighting of the surgical field. A high-resolution video system provides real-time video and photo imaging during surgery for direct communication with the Department of Pathology or teleconferencing and live broadcasts of surgery for physician training and medical education.