The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine

UConn, JAX Confront Pain With First-In-State Consortium

illustration of older man holding back in pain


An estimated 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain — more than those affected by heart disease, cancer, and diabetes combined, according to The National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine. How best to manage that pain in the face of a nationwide opioid crisis is the question on many practitioners’ minds.

The Connecticut Pain Consortium — a translational pain research and education collaboration between UConn Health, the UConn schools of Medicine and Nursing, and The Jackson Laboratory — aims to help answer it.

Given the broad range of research interests and funding opportunities related to pain, the founders envision that centers across the University and nearly every UConn school and college — particularly the schools of Dental Medicine and Pharmacy — will join the consortium to build mutually beneficial collaborations. Experts from Yale University and hospitals including Connecticut Children’s Medical Center will also be involved.

“There is a clear need for more basic and translational research on human pain and pain management,” says the Consortium’s director, mathematician and computational biologist Reinhard Laubenbacher, a joint faculty member at UConn Health and The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine.

“And there is a critical unmet need for education and training of providers and patients. This is a great opportunity to deploy our capabilities in pain research and addiction together with our Connecticut partners in an exciting and much-needed statewide initiative.”

The Consortium, the first of its kind in the Connecticut medical community, will establish a portal for pain-related health care data and facilitate research collaborations that leverage state and national resources. It will aim to translate that research into cutting-edge pain management solutions and raise awareness of the many facets of pain, pain management, and potential related ramifications including opioid addiction. The Consortium will contribute to a curriculum on pain research and management for health care providers.

The launch is being funded by a $55,000 planning grant from the Mayday Fund, whose mission is to support projects that close the gap between knowledge and practice in the treatment of pain, to the UConn Foundation. The Consortium has also received support from the UConn Office of the Vice President for Research, the schools of Nursing and Medicine, and the Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine.

“This new consortium builds upon strengths already existing in the School of Medicine, with an existing core of faculty focused on pain research,” says Dr. Bruce T. Liang, dean of the School. “Thanks to this grant, we believe there will be numerous opportunities for advancement in the study and treatment of pain.”

Curators Versus Cancer

By Kim Krieger | Illustrations by Kailey Whitman

illustration of scientist look over hundreds of books

A special team of medical literature experts are on the hunt for cancer’s kryptonite, one mutation at a time.


If the genetic code is like a book, then a mutation is like a typo. Some typos are meaningless. Others have such dramatic consequences for a book, or a life, that the error alone could have an entire novel written about it.

Cancer mutations are like that. As oncology moves toward precision medicine — the idea that if we knew exactly which genetic mutations make a particular cancer tick, we could pick exactly the right treatments — oncologists have to keep up with an ever-expanding library of mutations and the drugs that might foil them. The number of cancer research papers published increases every year; there were about 35,000 published in 2015 just in the U.S. It’s far more than any one person can keep up with.

In the same way that a university has research librarians who keep up with the literature in specific fields, JAX has experts who keep up with cancer gene and drug research, even studies that are ongoing and not yet published.

A new collaboration between UConn Health and The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) hopes to help oncologists find the right treatments by keeping up with research for them — and using the institutions’ combined expertise in cancer treatment, molecular biology, and genetics to improve patient outcomes for cancers that currently don’t have good treatments. In the same way that a university has research librarians who keep up with the literature in specific fields, JAX has experts who keep up with cancer gene and drug research, even studies that are ongoing and not yet published. JAX already successfully connects these experts with doctors in the Maine Cancer Genomics Initiative, a philanthropy-funded statewide precision medicine program. UConn Health and JAX hope to expand the concept and demonstrate its feasibility more widely.

A UConn Health researcher holds a tumor sample.

A UConn Health researcher holds a tumor sample. Kristin Wallace

Bull’s Eye Treatment

Imagine that a patient has surgery or a needle biopsy to diagnose a tumor. It’s a particularly ugly tumor, the surgeon, oncologist, and pathologist all agree. Invasive, spreading, and perhaps this isn’t the first time this patient has had to come in for cancer surgery. The tumor is sampled and sent for genetic testing. In about two weeks, the results come back: there are three genetic variants in the tumor that might be drug targets.

At UConn Health, oncologists can send portions of particularly malignant tumors to a team at the JAX Clinical Laboratory. JAX sends back a report with information the oncologist can use to pick a drug regimen with the best chance to shrink that ugly tumor. “The goal is to define the optimal treatment regimen for each individual patient” who may not have good options otherwise, says Dr. Ketan R. Bulsara, chief of neurosurgery at UConn Health and one of the principal investigators on the project.

At UConn Health, oncologists can send portions of particularly malignant tumors to a team at the JAX Clinical Laboratory. JAX sends back a report with information the oncologist can use to pick a drug regimen with the best chance to shrink that ugly tumor.

The report is intended to be a standalone reference an oncologist can use to inform a treatment plan. But if the oncologist is unfamiliar with one of the mutations identified in the report or just wants more information, they can request that a genomic tumor board be convened. The board is composed of surgeons, pathologists, and molecular oncologists who act as external advisors, sharing their opinions with the oncologist. In just 15 minutes, the oncologist can get a wealth of expert opinion to combine with their own expertise and judgment. In the end, the oncologist and patient decide on the best treatment, based on all the available information.

“In a multidisciplinary fashion, doctors and scientists work hand in hand in this with one common goal: identify the best treatment regimen for that particular patient’s pathology,” Bulsara says.
The focus is always on the patient. But behind the scenes, there’s an entire team of researchers whose work goes into the genetic tumor report. Scientists at JAX Clinical Laboratory sequence the tumor’s genetic code and report information on more than 200 cancer-related genes. The genes were picked because they are associated with both malignancy and potential drug treatments. Any mutations or variants in these genes might be a clue to the cancer’s weakness. Or a red herring.

“A typical tumor might have 2,000 mutations. Not all of them really matter,” says Andrey Antov, the program director for the Maine Cancer Genome Initiative at JAX. Finding the key mutations that matter, the two or ten or twenty that could possibly inform treatment and a better outcome for the patient, is the job of the clinical genomic curators.

Personal Librarians

The clinical genomic curators are specialists in fields such as molecular oncology and oncological pharmacology. They’re dedicated to keeping up with the literature on cancer genes and the drugs that target them. More and more of these drug-gene connections are being discovered every day. It’s exciting, but the sheer volume of papers can be overwhelming. Navigating that ocean of scientific papers is the medical curators’ full-time job. They’re like librarians curating a Boston Public Library–size collection of genes and drugs with no cross references in the card catalog and only an imperfect search function. The hope is that just as a good librarian’s knowledge of the subject matter can unearth texts a researcher would never otherwise find, a medical curator’s grasp of oncological genetics and pharmacology can identify potential treatments that would otherwise remain obscure.

Each mutation identified by the genetic panel might require 10 to 20 scientific publications to understand. Once the curators have a handle on the variants’ significance, the clinical laboratory decides which two or three should be described in the report to the oncologist.

illustration of books in a library cart

Sifting the information down to something relevant and digestible is the ultimate goal.

“Today, all this information is disorganized and may not all be in the oncologist’s head. We’re trying to bring it together,” says Jens Rueter, medical director for the Maine Cancer Genome Initiative.

The ideal outcome of a tumor genetic analysis would be to identify a mutation such as the HER2 gene that is turned on in the most aggressive breast cancers. HER2 is responsible for the cancer’s malignancy. But it’s also the cancer’s Achilles’ heel. Once drugs were developed to block the HER2 protein, survival rates climbed sharply.

The goal of the Maine Cancer Genomics Initiative is to enable oncologists to identify other drug-gene connections as potent as the ones found for HER2. Although more and more of these drug-gene connections are being discovered, it remains difficult to provide a patient with access to these drugs. Many of them are only available if a patient participates in a clinical trial. And often, there are barriers to accessing clinical trials, and getting drugs off-label is the only way to get patients to treatments. That’s another benefit that Antov, Bulsara, and Rueter hope UConn Health’s collaboration with JAX will bring.

Positive Outcomes

Ultimately, the researchers hope to demonstrate that this approach leads to better outcomes for patients. During the past year more than 350 patients and 70 oncology practitioners (more than 80 percent of the Maine oncology community) enrolled in the Maine Cancer Genomics Initiative study protocol. A few patients have already been offered a targeted treatment through a trial or a compassionate drug access program as a result of enrollment in the program. And Maine health care professionals have logged more than 1,200 certified education hours through 35 genomic tumor boards, online modules, and annual forums held by JAX.

So far, five patients have done this at UConn Health within the last two months. Generous donors have given enough to fund 20 more.

The hope is that just as a good librarian’s knowledge of the subject matter can unearth texts a researcher would never otherwise find, a medical curator’s grasp of oncological genetics and pharmacology can identify potential treatments that would otherwise remain obscure.

“We hope to get funding for at least 100 patients to show the feasibility of this approach,” Bulsara says. “We want to show we can do this reliably, and that it reliably improves patient care.”

UConn Health already has the infrastructure to do this, in particular a biorepository for tumors set up by Neag Cancer Center Director Dr. Pramod Srivastava and pathologist Dr. Melinda Sanders. With that foundation and support from UConn medical school Dean Dr. Bruce Liang and UConn Health CEO Dr. Andrew Agwunobi, the program was piloted in the Department of Surgery by Bulsara, its chief of neurosurgery, with support from Department of Surgery Chairman Dr. David McFadden, hematology and oncology chief Dr. Susan Tannenbaum, anatomical pathology chief Dr. Qian Wu, and JAX Clinical Laboratory Director Honey Reddi.

If the UConn Health–JAX initiative does prove its feasibility, the approach will continue to spread and become a standard of care.

More oncologists could have access to the library of knowledge and advice of a genetic tumor board, and more cancer patients could benefit from longer, healthier lives.

Tumor samples are housed in UConn Health's research biorepository.

Tumor samples are housed in UConn Health’s research biorepository. Kristin Wallace

Lab Notes – Spring 2018

Early Dependency Leads to Lower Achievement

cannabis

A new study has found that young adults who are dependent on marijuana and alcohol are less likely to achieve adult life goals. UConn Health scientists from the psychiatry department analyzed data from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism’s Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) and found that these substance-dependent young adults go on to have lower levels of education, decreased rates of full-time employment, less marriage potential, and less social economic potential. The study, presented at the American Public Health Association 2017 Annual Meeting & Expo, also found that marijuana and alcohol dependency may have a more severe effect on young men, affecting them in all areas of measure versus women, who were less likely to obtain a college degree and had lower economic potential, but were equally likely to get married or obtain full-time employment.


Biodegradable Sensor Monitors Pressure, Disappears

hand holding tiny biodegradable sensor

A patent is pending for a biodegradable pressure sensor developed by UConn engineers that could help doctors monitor chronic lung disease, swelling of the brain, and other medical conditions, before dissolving harmlessly in a patient’s body. The small, flexible sensor is made of medically safe materials already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in surgical sutures, bone grafts, and medical implants. It is designed to replace existing implantable pressure sensors that have potentially toxic components and require an additional invasive procedure to remove, extending patients’ recovery time and increasing the risk of infection. The research was funded by a National Institutes of Health grant and funds from UConn’s Academic Plan and is featured online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


DNA Becomes Harder to Access as We Age

A comparison between the immune cells of seniors ages 65 and over and those of adults between the ages of 22 and 40 has revealed that DNA changes with age, impacting how the immune system renews itself. In the sample from the aging population, chromosomes appeared more tightly coiled, making it difficult for cells to access the DNA that might be critical in defending our bodies against diseases, including flu and some cancers. In contrast, the regions of chromosome coding for genes associated with cell death and inflammation appeared to be more open in the elderly than in the young. The study, conducted by a team from UConn Health and the Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, appeared in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

DNA strand


Portable Microscope a Game Changer in the Field

portable microscope

UConn optical engineers have developed a portable holographic microscope that enables medical professionals to identify diseased cells and other biological specimens in the field in just minutes. The detailed holograms generated by the microscope can be used by medical workers attempting to identify malaria patients in remote areas of Africa and Asia, where the disease is endemic. It also can be used in hospitals and other clinical settings for rapid analysis of cell morphology and cell physiology associated with cancer, hepatitis, HIV, sickle cell disease, heart disease, and other illnesses. The device was recently featured in a paper published by Applied Optics.

Event Spotlight: Global Genomics Conference

Genomics and Society: expanding the ELSI universe


UConn Health and The Jackson Laboratory Host Global Genomics Conference

Good genomics research requires healthy curiosity, powerful data analysis, rigorous scientific methodology — and a strong ethical grounding. UConn Health and the Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine co-hosted the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Research Program’s (ELSI) fourth-annual conference June 5 through 7 to explore how ethical decisions surrounding genomic discoveries are informed by the legal and social context of our society.

Nearly 300 people attended the three-day “Genomics and Society: Expanding the ELSI Universe” conference, which brought experts from around the world to UConn Health in Farmington, Connecticut, to discuss both what we can do with our genomic knowledge and the responsibilities that come with that power.

“The increase in genomic testing and technology are fueling breakthrough discoveries here in Connecticut and around the globe for heart disease, cancer, and a host of rare diseases,” said Dr. Bruce T. Liang, dean of UConn School of Medicine. “However, these promising personalized medicine therapies and our greater genetic knowledge may also come with a steep societal price if we don’t address the associated concerns in a timely fashion.”

Keynote speakers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and universities across the country spoke about the ethics of genomics in the clinical setting; the relationship between genes, ancestry, and identity; and the NIH’s All of Us initiative. All of Us seeks to broaden the genetic database used for research in the United States so that it more accurately reflects the citizenry and the differences in lifestyle, environment, and biology encountered in different populations across the country.

Much of the funding for ELSI comes from the National Human Genome Research Institute, with the goal of supporting research that anticipates and addresses the societal impact of genomic science. The institute has four broad priorities: genomic research; tracking how that research influences health care; exploring how social norms and beliefs affect how we understand genetic advances and how we use them; and legal, regulatory, and public policy issues. Workshops at the conference covered specific topics from those areas, including the implications of genetic testing in the criminal justice system; the uses and misuses of the gene editing technique known as CRISPR; and the controversies over the appropriate use of genetics in psychiatric, neurologic, and behavioral fields.

More information about the ELSI project.

Tell-Tale Heart

‘Heart-In-A-Dish’ Sheds Light on Heart Disease Genetics

By Nicole Davis for The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine
Photography by Peter Morenus

Dr. Travis Hinson holds petri dishes containing beating heart tissue

Dr. J. Travis Hinson is seen holding petri dishes that contain heart cells. Hinson, a joint faculty appointment at UConn Health and The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, has pioneered a system to study the genetics of heart failure by recreating beating heart tissue using patients’ stem cells. Photo: Peter Morenus


When a patient shows symptoms of cancer, a biopsy is taken. Scientists study the tissue, examining it under a microscope to determine exactly what’s going on.

But the same can’t be done for heart disease, the leading cause of death among Americans. Until now.

Dr. J. Travis Hinson, a physician-scientist who joined the faculties of UConn Health and The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine (JAX) in January, uses a novel system he pioneered to study heart tissue.

Hinson engineers heart-like structures with cells containing specific genetic mutations in order to study the genetics of cardiomyopathies, the diseases of the heart muscle that can lead to heart failure and, ultimately, death.

“We basically try to rebuild a little piece of a patient’s heart in a dish,” says Hinson, who developed the technique during his postdoctoral fellowship.
He combines cardiac muscle cells with support cells, such as fibroblasts, and other key factors, including extracellular matrix proteins. Although these tiny, three-dimensional structures do not pump blood, they do contract rhythmically, and their beating strength can be studied.

Making a Difference

Hinson is applauded for his ability to move seamlessly between research, clinical practice, and teaching — the three prongs of an academic medical center’s mission. He’s able to do so, perhaps, because his own career began at the intersection of multiple scientific specialties.

As a University of Pennsylvania undergraduate, Hinson interned at DuPont in New Jersey to explore interests in chemistry and engineering. But he soon realized his passion for science needed a real-word focus. “I wanted to do science that made a difference in people’s health,” he says.

The same summer, he volunteered in the emergency department of a local hospital. Impressed by a cardiologist’s calm and collected manner in a crisis, and gaining interest in the heart, Hinson changed his career trajectory from engineering to medical school.

Hinson and his colleagues can isolate skin or blood cells directly from cardiomyopathy patients and coax them to form heart muscle cells, making it possible to study the biological effects of patients’ own mutations.

Hinson joined the laboratory of Dr. Robert J. Levy, a pediatric cardiologist and researcher at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, working to harness gene therapy techniques to make artificial heart valves and other cardiovascular devices more durable. Through this early foray into biomedical research, Hinson deepened his interest in biomedical science and gained an appreciation of the work of a physician-scientist.

In Dr. Christine Seidman’s lab at Harvard Medical School, Hinson chose to lead a project on Björnstad syndrome, a rare, inherited syndrome characterized by hearing loss and twisted, brittle hair. At the time, little was known about the molecular causes of the disorder, although the genetic culprits were thought to reside within a large swath of chromosome 2. Using genetic mapping techniques and DNA sequencing, Hinson homed in on the precise mutations.

In addition to casting light on disease biology, he glimpsed the power of genomic information. “I was fascinated by the potential for understanding new genes that cause human diseases, and how important that was to society,” Hinson says.

Matters of the Heart

Throughout his medical training, Hinson noticed there were some significant stumbling blocks to gathering a deep knowledge of heart disease, particularly cardiomyopathies.

Cardiac muscle has essentially two paths toward dysfunction and ultimate failure. It can either dilate — become abnormally large and distended — or it can thicken. Both routes severely impair how well the heart performs as a pump. These conditions, known as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), can stem from pre-existing disorders of the heart, such as a previous heart attack or long-standing hypertension, or from DNA mutations.

Fueled by advances in genomics over the last two decades, more than 40 genes have been identified that underlie cardiomyopathy. But unlike diseases such as cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia, where it is fairly common for affected individuals from different families to carry the exact same genetic typo, it is exceedingly rare for unrelated patients with cardiomyopathy to share the same mutation. With such a complex genetic architecture, figuring out how the different genes and gene mutations contribute to heart disease has been an enormous challenge.


Dr. Travis Hinson speaks with others in his lab

Above: Dr. J. Travis Hinson gives a tour of his laboratory. Photo: Peter Morenus


Because of this formidable hurdle, drug discovery for the cardiomyopathies has languished. “There really has not been a paradigm-shifting drug developed for heart failure in the last 20 years,” says Hinson. Moreover, the few treatments that do exist are primarily aimed at controlling patients’ symptoms, not slowing or halting their disease.

Hinson aims to improve this picture. With his “heart-in-a-dish” technique, he and his team are now unraveling the effects of genetic mutations on cardiac biology.

The system harnesses multiple recent advances in both stem cell and genome editing technologies. With these capabilities, Hinson and his colleagues can isolate skin or blood cells directly from cardiomyopathy patients and coax them to form heart muscle cells, making it possible to study the biological effects of patients’ own mutations. Moreover, he can correct those mutations, or create additional ones, to further probe how genetic differences influence heart biology.

Part of the allure of Hinson’s approach is that it can be readily applied to study other forms of heart disease. It can also be leveraged for drug discovery, providing a platform to screen and test compounds with therapeutic potential in a wide range of cardiovascular diseases.

In addition to his research lab based at JAX, Hinson continues to practice cardiology at UConn Health. He helps run a specialized clinic focused on genetic forms of heart disease, as well as arrhythmias, connective tissue disorders, and other conditions.

“We have an exciting opportunity to provide clinical services in cardiac genetics in the corridor between New York and Boston,” he says. That means state-of-the-art genetic testing, including gene panels and genome sequencing, as well as genetic counseling for both patients and family members to help inform disease diagnosis and guide treatment. Although there are only a handful of treatments now available, Hinson believes this clinic will be uniquely poised to take advantage of a new generation of personalized treatments that are precisely tailored to patients’ specific gene mutations.

“Travis really is a quintessential physician-scientist,” says Dr. Bruce Liang, dean of UConn School of Medicine and director of the Pat and Jim Calhoun Cardiology Center at UConn Health.

“He has a remarkable ability to link basic science with important clinical problems, and his work holds a great deal of promise for developing new treatments for patients with cardiomyopathy. I wish there were two or three Travis Hinsons.”


Hinson’s beating heart tissue. Provided by Dr. Travis Hinson

UConn to Establish Genetic Counseling Master’s Program

illustration of genetic material


UConn has awarded $300,174 to seed a new Professional Science Master’s (PSM) Program in Genetics, Genomics, and Counseling. Graduates of the program will work with doctors and patients to interpret the results of genetic testing, a rapidly growing area in health care that needs more trained personnel. Once accredited, the program will be the first in Connecticut and the only one in New England at a public institution.

“Our students are anxious. They want to do this,” says Judy Brown, director of the diagnostic genetic sciences program in UConn’s College of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources’ allied health sciences department. Brown is spearheading the push for the program along with Institute for Systems Genomics director Marc Lalande and UConn Health genetics counselor Ginger Nichols.

Once accredited, the program will be the first in Connecticut and the only one in New England at a public institution.

New genetics research and techniques have made it easy for the average person to get a read on their genome, or whole genetic code. Celebrities, including Angelina Jolie, who have openly discussed their genetic risk factors for cancer, and companies, such as 23andMe, that will provide a basic genetic report for a fee, have increased demand enormously. But there’s a lack of trained people who can accurately interpret and explain the results of genetic tests, limiting the potential benefits.

Ideally, a doctor who identifies “red flags” within a patient’s family history that indicate increased genetic risk for disease will call in a genetic counselor. The counselor can take a detailed family history, determine the appropriateness of genetic testing, discuss benefits and limitations of testing to help the patient make an informed decision, and advise the patient on who else in their family might be at risk. If testing occurs and results indicate high genetic risk, counselors can help discuss the options to mitigate that risk.

As a result, genetic counseling is the fourth-fastest-growing occupation in Connecticut. Many UConn allied health sciences majors would like to enter the profession, Brown says, but there are only 34 training programs in the U.S., and the acceptance rate is below 8 percent.

Institutions including Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) have expressed support for the program. Kate Reed, director of the Clinical and Continuing Education Program at JAX, says JAX would combine its experience translating genetic discoveries into clinical applications with UConn’s experience in this area to give the PSM graduates a solid understanding of the research behind clinical treatments.

The exact roles of JAX, Connecticut Children’s, and the other institutions who support the new PSM have not yet been defined. The program’s curriculum first needs to be approved and accredited. The first students are expected to start the program in fall 2018.

Lab Notes – Fall 2016

‘Morrbid’ RNA Could Be Key to Asthma Treatment

No.2 Pencil eraser erasing a piece of an RNA strand

Researchers have discovered a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory disorders that are characterized by abnormal myeloid cell lifespan, such as asthma, Churg-Strauss syndrome, and hypereosinophilic syndrome. Investigators including Adam Williams of UConn Health and The Jackson Laboratory named the novel long non-coding RNA ‘Morrbid’ (Myeloid RNA Regulator of Bim-Induced Death). They discovered that Morrbid tightly controls how long circulating myeloid cells live — which is key to maintaining the balance between fighting infection and exacerbating inflammation — by overriding a signaling mechanism that prevents premature immune cell death. In mice, deleting the gene helped protect them against inflammation and immunopathology. The findings were published online in Nature, Aug. 15, 2016.


Parents Living Longer is Good News for Offspring, Study Says

Father and young son laugh together and hug

A new study led by the University of Exeter and co-authored by the UConn Center on Aging, among other international contributors, shows that how long a person’s parents live can help predict how long the offspring will live, and how healthy the child will be as he or she ages. The study of 186,000 participants, aged 55 to 73 years and followed for up to eight years, is the largest of its kind. It found that a person’s chance of survival increased by 17 percent for each decade that at least one parent lived beyond age 70, and that those with longer-lived parents had lower rates of heart disease and other circulatory conditions, as well as cancer. The study was published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Aug. 15, 2016.


PRP Limits Ill Effects of Osteoarthritis Treatment

red blood cells

Giving platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to patients undergoing treatment for osteoarthritis may limit the negative effects of the drugs used to manage their symptoms, according to a new study led by Dr. Augustus Mazzocca, director of the UConn Musculoskeletal Institute, and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Osteoarthritis is the most common chronic condition of the joints, causing pain, stiffness, and swelling in approximately 27 million Americans. Powerful anti-inflammatory medicines and local anesthetics relieve pain and improve range of motion, but can also lead to tissue degeneration. In the study, published in the August issue of The American Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers found combining PRP with these treatments significantly reduced their toxic effect on the cells and even improved their proliferation.


Bath Salts 101: Pharmacist Explains Party Drugs

Synthetic party drugs with dangerous hallucinogenic properties, such as those sold commercially as “bath salts,” continue to pose a significant public health risk around the country. C. Michael White — head of the Department of Pharmacy Practice in UConn’s School of Pharmacy — published a comprehensive review of synthetic cathinones in the June 2016 issue of The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology to help clinicians recognize signs of abuse and properly treat patients with adverse events, ranging from psychosis to heart disease, from the drugs. This is the third in a series of articles on drugs including molly/ecstasy and GHB that he wrote to support clinicians. He is currently working on an assessment of synthetic marijuana.

dirty spoon holds 'bath salt' drug