therapy

For Anxiety, Single Intervention Is Not Enough

illustration on the concept of anxiety. Features a male with hands held to forhead in slumped possition. Mans face is scribbled.


No matter which treatment they get, only 20 percent of young people diagnosed with anxiety will stay well over the long term, UConn Health researchers report in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

“When you see so few kids stay non-symptomatic after receiving the best treatments we have, that’s discouraging,” says UConn Health psychologist Golda Ginsburg. She suggests that regular mental health checkups may be a better way to treat anxiety than the current model.

The study followed 319 young people aged 10 to 25 who had been diagnosed with separation, social, or general anxiety disorders at sites in California, North Carolina, Maryland, and Pennsylvania.
They received evidence-based treatment with either sertraline (the generic form of Zoloft) or cognitive behavioral therapy or a combination of the two and then had follow-ups with the researchers every year for four years.

The follow-ups assessed anxiety levels but did not provide treatment. Other studies have done a single follow-up after one, two, five, or 10 years, but those were essentially snapshots in time. This is the first study to reassess youth treated for anxiety every year for four years.

We need a different model for mental health, one that includes regular checkups.

The sequential follow-ups meant that the researchers could identify people who relapsed, recovered, and relapsed again as well as people who stayed anxious and people who stayed well. They found that 20 percent of patients got well after treatment and stayed well, rating low on anxiety at each follow-up. But about half the patients relapsed at least once, and 30 percent were chronically anxious, meeting the diagnostic criteria for an anxiety disorder at every follow-up. Females were more likely to be chronically ill than males. Other predictors of chronic illness were experiencing more negative life events, having poor family communication, and having a diagnosis of social phobia.

On the bright side, the study found that young people who responded to treatment were more likely to stay well. The study also found no difference in long-term outcomes between treatment types. This means that if there is no cognitive behavioral therapist nearby, treatment with medication is just as likely to be effective.

The study also found that kids did better if their families were supportive and had positive communication styles. Parents should talk to their child and ask the therapist questions: Why do they suggest this treatment? (It should be supported by evidence.) Have they been trained in cognitive behavioral therapy? How can we reinforce what was learned in therapy this week?

But parents should also be aware that a single intervention may not be enough.

“If we can get them well, how do we keep them well?” says Ginsburg. “We need a different model for mental health, one that includes regular checkups.”

‘Talk to Your Mother’ Proves to be Healthy Advice

Daughter has serious conversation with mother outdoors


Bringing out the proverbial “skeleton in the closet” can provide health benefits, but the degree of benefit depends on who you confide in, says a new UConn study.

The study of 400 people, published in the Journal of Health Psychology, found that people who are living with issues such as mental illness, substance abuse, domestic violence, rape, or childhood abuse reap considerable health benefits from discussing those issues.

But they experience more health benefits – both psychological and physical – from disclosing the issue to mom, a romantic partner, or a best friend than from disclosing it to dad, siblings, or a close colleague, says Diane Quinn, UConn psychology professor and study author.

People have unseen scars and they may be reluctant to talk about their stigmatized identity or experience … but if they do choose to talk about it, then they will gain even more benefit from their social interactions than if they remain silent.

“It seems that people expect their mothers to love them unconditionally, and they just assume that she will handle letting the rest of the family – including the father –know about a problem,” says Quinn.

Researchers studied a group of people who averaged 32 years old and who had at least one past experience that they kept hidden from others.

Participants were asked to rate their social networks according to differing degrees of support. Those ranged from a basic level of support, such as an offer to go to lunch, to more substantial support, such as an offer of a place to stay during an emergency. They were also asked to rate their own physical health, both in terms of actual symptoms of illness and how they perceived their health in general. Finally, they were asked to quantify how “out” they were about their issue within their social network.

Results showed that people who characterized themselves as being the most “out” derived the greatest health benefits, especially when their confidantes included mom, a romantic partner, or a close friend.

“People have unseen scars and they may be reluctant to talk about their stigmatized identity or experience,” says co-author Bradley Weisz, a doctoral student in psychology, “but if they do choose to talk about it, then they will gain even more benefit from their social interactions than if they remain silent.”

But while being “out” about a stigmatized identity or a traumatic experience can be helpful in the long run, Quinn says that not everyone has to follow the same path. “It’s a matter of your personal comfort zone,” she says.

Funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the study was also co-authored by UConn psychology professor Michelle Williams.