UConn Department of Pediatrics

Together for the Kids

By Lauren Woods

Dr. Emily  Germain-Lee  with a patient at the Albright Center at Connecticut Children's Medical Center.

Dr. Emily Germain-Lee with a patient at the Albright Center at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center.
Erin Blinn Curran/ Connecticut Children’s Medical Center


National recognition by external sources such as U.S. News & World Report comes as no surprise to the thousands who pass through Connecticut Children’s Medical Center each year.

What may be unexpected to those patients is that such success is the fruit of a more than 50-year legacy of the pediatric department at UConn School of Medicine advancing pediatric medicine, research, and education in Connecticut — and putting the health of the state’s tiniest residents first.

The life-changing work done by UConn’s Department of Pediatrics is made possible by a special partnership: Connecticut Children’s Medical Center is the teaching hospital where medical students, pediatric residents, and fellows are trained, as well as the home of the faculty’s clinical care work.

“UConn’s Department of Pediatrics’ strong relationship with Connecticut Children’s is excellent and seamless. There is no us and them. We are truly one, and we couldn’t excel without each other,” says Dr. Bruce T. Liang, the dean of the UConn School of Medicine since 2015. Liang has helped expand the two institutions’ joint recruitment of world-renowned physician-scientists and has led much of their growth in pediatric research.

For the Greater Good

The seeds of excellence in pediatric care in the Hartford area were planted in 1967 with the founding of UConn’s Department of Pediatrics, shortly before the medical school admitted its first class in 1968. UConn John Dempsey Hospital offered pediatric hospital care when it opened in 1975. Hartford-area hospitals had an informal agreement not to duplicate pediatric specialty services — patients were transferred among the hospitals based on their specialty care needs.

Connecticut Children’s was born in April 1996 after Newington Children’s Hospital, Hartford Hospital, and John Dempsey voluntarily closed their pediatric services so a comprehensive children’s hospital could open. It was established by state legislation and a 99-year lease of land on Hartford Hospital’s campus for 1 dollar per year. St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center’s pediatric programs were also incorporated. Uniquely, the leadership structure of the new pediatric hospital required that the same individual serve as both UConn’s Department of Pediatrics chair and Connecticut Children’s physician-in-chief.

“I am honored to have seen firsthand the strong evolution in pediatrics since my 1980s UConn pediatric residency training,” says Dr. Juan C. Salazar, who has served in that joint leadership role at UConn and Connecticut Children’s since 2013. “It is amazing that the strengths of four different Hartford hospitals came together for the greater good of our children and continue to offer the best pediatric care. It’s been an incredible success, allowing us to grow pediatrics clinically and educationally, along with our research mission.”

Salazar cites pediatric endocrinologists Dr. David Weinstein and Dr. Emily Germain-Lee as “two of several perfect examples of how the partnership of Connecticut Children’s and UConn really works seamlessly, with clinical services provided at Connecticut Children’s while robust laboratory research and clinical trials are under way at UConn.”

For 2018–19, U.S. News & World Report ranks Connecticut Children’s among the best hospitals in four pediatric specialties: cardiology and heart surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, neonatology, and urology. As one of the state’s largest care providers with 300 faculty members, UConn’s Department of Pediatrics has 31 medical and 13 surgical specialties.


Dr. David Weinstein, head of the Glycogen Storage Disease Program at UConn Health and Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, walks with Alyssa Temkin through the new clinic at Connecticut Children’s.

Dr. David Weinstein with a patient
Peter Morenus


For a Brighter Future

In addition to translational research and top clinical care, UConn Health’s mission includes a third focus on teaching the practitioners of tomorrow. UConn is the largest educator for the state’s pediatric medicine workforce, as up to 60 percent of pediatricians in Connecticut have graduated from UConn’s medical school or its pediatric training programs.

Historically, UConn has also provided the largest pipeline of medical students into the state’s pediatric residency programs — each year up to 20 percent of UConn’s graduating medical school class chooses to specialize in pediatrics, entering residency training programs here or around the country.

“Along with research advancements, our significant focus is the education and training of our next generation of pediatricians and pediatric specialists, many of whom stay right here in Connecticut to serve the state,” says Liang.

UConn and Connecticut Children’s continue to strengthen their partnership in all three areas by building relationships with other organizations.

The two institutions in 2016 joined with another collaborator, The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) for Genomic Medicine located on UConn Health’s campus, to recruit Dr. Ching C. Lau, an internationally recognized pediatric brain and bone tumor clinician and researcher.

UConn and Connecticut Children’s look forward to growing their alliance, Liang says, and are planning joint physician-scientist recruitments in the fields of medical genetics and gastroenterology, as well as further collaborations in maternal-fetal medicine.


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World-renowned physician-scientists across specialties bring to life the vision of Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and UConn School of Medicine’s Department of Pediatrics. Read on to learn about three of the groundbreaking physician-scientists who are currently dedicated to improving the lives of children in Connecticut and around the world.


A Vision for the Future of Pediatric Cancer

In 2016, Connecticut Children’s and UConn joined with another collaborator, The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) for Genomic Medicine located on UConn Health’s campus, to recruit Dr. Ching C. Lau, an internationally recognized pediatric brain and bone tumor clinician and researcher, from Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston.

As medical director of hematology-oncology at Connecticut Children’s and head of the Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology in the Department of Pediatrics at UConn, Lau’s JAX-based laboratory aims to leverage new, sophisticated genomic medicine techniques, mouse models, and therapeutic treatments to choose the best therapy for patients and discover new treatments.

When he was awarded the inaugural Martin J. Gavin Endowed Chair in Hematology/Oncology at Connecticut Children’s, Lau said he was attracted to the vision and dedication of Connecticut Children’s Medical Center.

“I dream that one day when I look at a child diagnosed with cancer, I can look him or her in the eye and say, ‘You will be cured without having to come to the hospital for therapy. You just have to go home and take this medicine,’” he said.

Lau is focused on accelerating the pace and success rate of clinical trials in pediatric cancer patients. “Although the incidence of cancer among children is much lower than that in adults,” he says, “it can be just as deadly. And because of the smaller number of patients available, clinical trials of new treatments for pediatric cancers are conducted at a much slower pace. Typically patients are enrolled in clinical trials after their cancers progress or are found not to be responsive to standard therapy.”
As a result, he says, pediatric cancer patients are exposed to side effects of standard therapy without therapeutic benefit. “This is a particularly serious problem for children because they are still undergoing normal growth and are particularly vulnerable to the side effects of anticancer drugs.”

By using the combined approach of genomic medicine and accurate mouse models to choose the best therapy for each patient, Lau hopes to improve the speed and outcome of clinical trials as well as to reduce unnecessary side effects for children with cancer.

One way he’s speeding up the process is through Smash Childhood Cancer, an initiative he’s spearheading for the U.S. alongside international researchers and IBM to find prospective treatments for childhood cancers by conducting millions of virtual experiments to help pinpoint promising drug candidates for further study using IBM’s World Community Grid.

“This kind of research expedites finding new treatments for childhood cancers,” Lau says. “Crowdsourcing computer processing power enables us to perform millions of experiments virtually and will save us years of experiments. It is bringing us that much closer to finding the right drug for each type of cancer.”

 

Administering New Therapy — and Hope

In late July, a patient named Jerrod received a drug infusion that he’s been waiting for his entire life.

Jerrod was the first patient to receive a promising investigational gene therapy to treat glycogen storage disease type Ia, the rare, potentially deadly genetic disorder he was born with. Dr. David Weinstein, a world-renowned pediatric endocrinologist and director of the Glycogen Storage Disease Program at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and UConn Health, has been working to develop the treatment for two decades and calls the trial “a big leap forward for GSD.”

Healthy livers store excess sugar from food and release it into our bloodstreams when we need it as processed sugar enzymes called glycogen. However, in the seven forms of GSD, the liver fails to break down glycogen into glucose, causing the body’s blood sugar levels to drop dangerously low, which can lead to seizure or death. Patients stay alive by consuming a cornstarch mixture every few hours to keep their blood sugar up.

The gene therapy undergoing the Phase 1/2 clinical trial, approved by the FDA in April, delivers a new copy of the gene to the patient’s liver to replace deficient sugar enzymes and jumpstart the body’s glucose control. Studies in animal models have already shown the promising gene therapy to be safe, effective, and long-lasting.

The clinical trial is in conjunction with the biopharmaceutical company Ultragenyx and will soon expand from UConn Health in the U.S. to other sites including Canada, Spain, and the Netherlands.

“This gene therapy is hope for all us GSD patients,” says Jerrod, who asked that his last name be withheld. “We are all extremely excited. Dr. Weinstein is a savior and so is the entire GSD program.”

Weinstein moved his GSD program — the largest in the world — to Connecticut Children’s and UConn Health in early 2017. His multidisciplinary team cares for 600 patients from 48 countries.

“The strong synergies and collaborative team science happening at UConn and Connecticut Children’s are world class and the most fertile ground to make a GSD cure reality,” says Weinstein.

 

Writing the Rulebook

Dr. Emily Germain-Lee, a professor of pediatrics and chief of pediatric endocrinology and diabetes, moved her first-of-its-kind Albright Center from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Kennedy Krieger Institute to UConn and Connecticut Children’s in October 2016. She has cared for more patients who have a specific rare set of endocrine diseases than any other doctor in the world.

“She has redefined the field of pediatric endocrinology,” Salazar said when the hire was announced. “Patients and families travel from all over the world seeking Dr. Germain-Lee’s care.”

Germain-Lee’s patients suffer from pseudohypoparathyroidism and its related disorders, including Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO), a rare inherited bone disorder caused by a genetic mutation that often leads to short bones and short stature. It is also frequently accompanied by severe multihormonal dysfunction in the body.

This summer, Germain-Lee co-authored the first international guidelines to help doctors around the globe diagnose and manage patients with the diseases. The new guidelines call for human growth hormone treatment for the vast majority of the patients who are at risk for short stature due to growth hormone deficiency. Germain-Lee was the first to discover that part of the reason why AHO patients are short is that two-thirds of them have a growth hormone deficiency.

Her long-term global clinical trial studies have shown the promising benefits of growth hormone treatment, including its ability to drastically increase a patient’s short stature to their original destined height potential while also improving their lipid levels and reducing obesity. With her research in the final stages, Germain-Lee is working toward gaining FDA approval of the therapy, which would be the first new therapy for the disorder in 70 years.

“I am thrilled to be a part of the combined power of UConn School of Medicine and Connecticut Children’s Medical Center for advancing children’s health and discovering new treatments of disease through research,” says Germain-Lee.